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Shreya Ila Anasuya Sanghani

More than anything, I like the radical spirit nurtured by the SOAS despite attacks on activists and the spirit of protest by all manner of socio-political and economic institutions. The faculty, in what and how they teach, enhanced the analytical tools I have to make myself a better person, trying to make what one of my favourite philosophers, Judith Butler, has called 'a more livable world.' Thank you SOAS. 

MA Anthropology of Development

To me, SOAS is one of the last bastions of compassion. My teachers and the other SOAS administrators I came into contact with provided tremendous amounts of support and inspiration. I always felt that at SOAS, my health and happiness as a human being mattered much more than my assignments and marks. I don't think there are many other universities that provide this kind of humble, beautiful friendship between the students and faculty. 

Besides, I was lucky enough to be in the fantastic anthropology department, with its own library, and some of the most enlightening and innovative classes I've ever had the pleasure to take. Beyond academia, there is a lot of opportunity to participate in a wide variety of activities at the SOAS. I was part of the World Music Choir, the Drama Society, and the Food Co-op - all immensely enjoyable, rewarding endeavours. 

More than anything, I like the radical spirit nurtured by the SOAS despite attacks on activists and the spirit of protest by all manner of socio-political and economic institutions. The faculty, in what and how they teach, enhanced the analytical tools I have to make myself a better person, trying to make what one of my favourite philosophers, Judith Butler, has called 'a more livable world.' Thank you SOAS.