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Nuren Sherali Parpia

Being at SOAS is a privilege I have greatly appreciated academically as well as socially. It really is a gem that surfaces unheard voices and unseen faces.

BA Development Studies and Africa

(January 2007) the UCAS deadline was approaching and I had no idea what to do…….

(September 2007) I arrived and knew it was the place for me, small and cosy yet based in the bright lights of London. I stayed at Dinwiddy House in my first year, which was an unforgettable experience. Never have I experienced the whole world under one roof; the Pakistani studying Arabic, the Pole studying Japanese, the Spanish dating a Russian and the Scottish cake deliveries, not forgetting the Middle Eastern nights!!. Due to the size of SOAS you get to know the whole university (SOASians) practically within a week (especially at the fresher’s weeks).

Studying Development Studies and African Studies has opened up new horizons for me. I have predominantly specialised in East Africa and recently shifted to learning Hausa in the West. SOAS provides students with plenty of flexibility to explore their talents and discover new ones. In my three years I have managed to cover the dimensions of Politics, African Literature, Economics, linguistics, Development theory, studied two languages (Swahili & Hausa) as part of my degree and a further one at the SOAS language centre (Somali).

Now to get to the fuzzy part… Being at SOAS is a privilege I have greatly appreciated academically as well as socially. It really is a gem that surfaces unheard voices and unseen faces. The people you meet will touch your heart like sisters (you know who you all are). By the time you get to your final year you’ll have to peel yourself off the wall, I miss SOAS already. :-(