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Ross Adkin

People come here to pursue things they’re passionate about and the sheer diversity of the student body is also another reason why school life is so fascinating

BA Nepali and History

Having been out of school for three years, the idea of university was a bit intimidating at first. I knew I didn’t want to return to education unless it was for something that was really going to interest me, but after hearing of SOAS’s reputation and the huge range of courses concerning South Asia, I had no hesitation in applying.

SOAS is the only institution in the UK to offer Nepali as a BA, and the opportunities to study the history of South Asia are unparalleled anywhere else. At the moment I’m hoping the degree combination I’ve chosen will allow me to pursue my studies of Nepal further - the medieval city-states of the Kathmandu Valley and their relationships with Tibet and northern India are fascinating and hugely under-researched. The range of current issues in northern India, Nepal and Bhutan is wide ranging and even more engaging; human rights issues, development, ecological change and refugee migration all present challenging debates in which a grounding in Nepali and the history and culture of the area are essential for anyone wishing to attempt to understand the Himalayan region today.

I was amazed to find out how many other people had spent time in exciting places and then chosen to come to SOAS and take their interest a step further. People come here to pursue things they’re passionate about and the sheer diversity of the student body is also another reason why school life is so fascinating. There are talks and lectures from leading academics and specialists all the time and contrary to what you might read, sport does happen; the rugby and basketball teams both won their leagues last year and the football team punches well above its weight for the size of the School.