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Tibetan Studies at SOAS

Circle of Tibetan and Himalayan Studies

 

This is the events page for the Circle of Tibetan and Himalayan Studies.

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Forthcoming Events

Buddhas, masters, and protectors

Marta Sernesi (LMU, Munich)

This lecture treats woodcut images in Tibetan xylographs from the 15th to the 17th centuries. Focusing on specific examples—such as the 1539 first edition of the bKa' gdams glegs bam—it discusses the conventions governing the choice and display of the figures on the page, in order to illustrate how images may recount stories of textual transmission and relate information about the circumstances of production of the books.

28 November 2014, 21/22 Russell Square, T101, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Gedun Chopel and his international circle of friends

Heather Stoddard (INALCO)

In February 1937, a dinner party was organised in Calcutta by Theos Bernard, the New York socialite, yoga practionner and Tibet enthusiast. The list of distinguished guests included: Sir Francis Younghusband; the Guomindang lady emissary to Tibet, Liu Manching; the American aviator Charles Lindberg; Gedun Chopel newly arrived in India; his teacher Geshe Sherab Gyatso; Da Lama Ngakchen, Rinpoche of Tashilhunpo Monastery; and the long time British Trade Agent in Tibet, David MacDonald.

9 January 2015, 21/22 Russell Square, T101, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

What happens when the mind recognizes its own nature?

Stéphane Arguillère (INALCO)

23 January 2015, 21/22 Russell Square, T101, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Towards a Tibetan Buddhist philosophy of language

Dorji Wangchuk (Hamburg)

This lecture will discuss Tibetan Buddhist philosophy of language, by considering six points, namely: (1) the ontology of language; (2) a typology of language; (3) a technology (or mechanism) of language; (4) language in the context of Buddhist ontology; (5) language in the context of Buddhist axiology (i.e. theory of values); and (6) language in the context of Buddhist logic and epistemology. This will be done by resorting to random writings of Tibetan Buddhist scholars.

24 April 2015, 21/22 Russell Square, T101, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM