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Department of the History of Art and Archaeology

Ottoman Art

Course Code:
15PARC011
Status:
Course Not Running 2014/2015
Unit value:
1
Taught in:
Full Year

The first part of this course deals with Ottoman art in Anatolia/Turkey from the 14th to the 18th centuries. Topics include: the emergence of Ottoman art and architecture in Bursa and Edirne (14th and 15th centuries); the impact of the Haghia Sophia church on the metropolitan style of Ottoman architecture in Istanbul (15th and 16th centuries); the court architect Sinan and his work (16th century); the after-Sinan period and the evolution of the Ottoman Baroque style in the 18th century; the significance of the Iznik ceramic production for Ottoman architecture; and Ottoman aesthetics and its interaction with Europe.

The second part will deal with the architecture of the Arab provinces of the Ottoman empire from the 16th to 18th centuries, mainly Egypt, Syria and Palestine, which are relatively well documented, but also with Iraq, the Arab Peninsula, Tunisia, Libya, and Algeria which are less well studied. After a brief reference to the local architectural and artistic traditions of these provinces before their conquest, the course will discuss the innovations introduced under Ottoman rule and consider the various forms of assimilation of Ottoman aesthetics in the art and architecture of these provinces. Although the emphasis of the course will be on architecture, (religious, commercial and residential) the art of ceramic tiles will be discussed as well as other crafts related to architecture decoration and furnishing.

Objectives and learning outcomes of the course

Knowledge Acquisition:

The first part of this course introduces subjects related to Ottoman art in Anatolia/Turkey from the 14th to the 18th centuries. The second part will deal with the architecture of the Arab provinces of the Ottoman empire mainly Egypt, Syria and Palestine, which are relatively well documented, but also with Iraq, the Arab Peninsula, Tunisia, Libya, and Algeria which are less well studied.

After a brief reference to the local architectural and artistic traditions of these provinces before their conquest, the course will discuss the innovations introduced under Ottoman rule and consider the various forms of assimilation of Ottoman aesthetics in the art and architecture of these provinces.

Although the emphasis of the course will be on architecture, (religious, commercial and residential) the art of ceramic tiles will be discussed as well as other crafts related to architecture decoration and furnishing.

Outcomes and acquisition of key skills:
  • Give broad-based introduction to the study of cultures influenced by Ottoman rule through an art historical approach.
  • An introductory course for students new to the subject, but still excellent overview and preparation for students who want to specialise in Islamic art.
  • Introduction to the study of methods of approaching non-western art.
  • Guidance in writing research papers on specialised topics at an advanced level.
  • A bibliography will be distributed and discussed in the first introductory class.

The objective is to teach the student a history of Ottoman architecture from its early period in Anatolia to the “Baroque” period in Istanbul and to look at Ottoman architecture in the Arab provinces, in particular Egypt and Syria. Upon completion of the course, students should know about the various sources of Ottoman architecture, the achievements of the architect Sinan in the creation of the classical style and the evolution of Iznik ceramics in Ottoman architectural decoration. They should also be familiar with the post-classical and baroque styles of the 17th and 18th centuries and discuss the relationship between imperial and provincial styles. The course will teach them to interpret ground plans and elevations and to use the bibliographical references in a manner that enables them to write interesting essays and an original dissertation on the subject. They will also learn about primary sources for advanced research.

Scope and syllabus

The course aims at giving students an understanding of the history of Ottoman architecture from its early period in Anatolia to the “Baroque” period in Istanbul and to look at Ottoman architecture in the Arab provinces, in particular Egypt and Syria. Upon completion of the course, students should know about the various sources of Ottoman architecture, the achievements of the architect Sinan in the creation of the classical style and the evolution of Iznik ceramics in Ottoman architectural decoration. They should also be familiar with the post-classical and baroque styles of the 17th and 18th centuries and discuss the relationship between imperial and provincial styles. The course will teach them to interpret ground plans and elevations and to use the bibliographical references in a manner that enables them to write interesting essays and an original dissertation on the subject. They will also learn about primary sources for advanced research.

Method of assessment

100% Coursework (3 pieces)

Suggested reading

  • Aslanapa, Oktay. Turkish Art and Architecture, London 1971.
  • Denny, Walter B. Iznik. The Artistry of Ottoman Ceramics, London 2004.
  • Freely, John, Istanbul The Imperial City, London 1996
  • Goodwin, Godfrey, A History of Ottoman Architecture, Baltimore 1971.
  • Goodwin, Godfrey, Sinan: Ottoman Architecture and its Value Today, London 1992. Kuban, Dogan, Ottoman Architecture, London 2010
  • Kuran, Aptullah, Sinan. The Grand Old Master of Ottoman Architecture. Washington/Istanbul 1987.
  • Kuran, Aptullah, The Mosque in Early Ottoman Architecture. Chicago/London 1968.
  • Necipoglu, Gülru, The Age of Sinan, London 2004.
  • Yerasimos, Stephane, Constantinople. Istanbul’s Historical Heritage, Paris 2000