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Department of Economics

Growth & development

Course Code:
15PECC007
Unit value:
0.4
Taught in:
Term 1

This module consists of a survey of key issues in the political economy of growth and development.  The aim is to familiarise students with the debate in key areas of policy and development analytical ability of students.  We emphasize the application of theory to real economic problems in developing countries.  Students are strongly encouraged to relate the ideas presented in the lectures to concrete examples in the developing world.

Growth and Development is broadly divided into four sections:

  1. The first consists of a critical assessment of growth theories including the convergence-divergence debate regarding trends in the international distribution of income and the links between growth and poverty reduction.
  2. Section two considers the role of industrialisation and labour markets in the growth process.
  3. The third section addresses agricultural and rural sector development including the role of agriculture in economic development and the relationship between rural poverty and growth.  It also looks at issues of commodity dependence and Dutch Disease theory.
  4. The final section looks at open economy issues and examines the links between trade and growth, aid and growth and the impact of IMF and World Bank policy based lending on growth and development.

Objectives and learning outcomes of the course

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand the major and minor strands in popular and policy-critical development debates.  They will be able to apply their knowledge in constructing a critical analysis of the issues for a particular country, and will be able to use economic data appropriately.  

Workload

The course consists of one lecture and one tutorial per week.  The tutorials will address the topics covered in the earlier lecture and discussion questions are provided for each week.  for most tutorials, two students will take responsibility for introducing the discussion topic in each tutorial class.  In your presentations please attempt to answer the discussion question based on the reading and available evidence.  Presentations are limited to ten minutes.  All students - even those who are not making a presentation - will be expected to come to the tutorials prepared to make a useful contribution to the class.  Students be allocated to one tutorial slot at the beginning of term and to attend class at the same time each week.  You may not change to another class without our prior arrangement.

Method of assessment

Assessment weighting: Exam 70% / Coursework 30% (1 essay). All coursework is resubmittable.

Suggested reading

  • Perkins, D.,  Radelet, S., Lindauer, D. and Block, S. (2013), Economics of Development, seventh edition, International Student Edition, Norton