[skip to content]

Department of Linguistics

Translation Technology

Course Code:
15PLIC018
Unit value:
1
Taught in:
Full Year

Objectives and learning outcomes of the course

At the end of the course, a student should 'be able to demonstrate . . . 

  • familiarity with the major translation software available to them and be able to use the software to assist them in practical translation
  • skills in terminology management and construction of small translation corpora or terminology bank to assist their translation practice
  • the ability to make use of internet resources for their translation
  • research skills in critiquing theories and principles on translation technology

Workload

This course will be taught over 22 weeks with 3 hours classroom contact per week.

Scope and syllabus

This course is to train students to apply their theoretical and conceptual background to a very practical approach to translation, ranging from using machine translation (MT) and computer- aided translation (CAT) tools in the tasks of translation memory (TM) management, terminology database (TD) management, translation project management, translation of documentation, and software localisation to exploiting translation resources available on the internet and legacy translation data. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts and simple use of corpus technology as a valuable resource to translators.

The course will teach students to make effective use of specialised tools to enhance their translation productivity, share data and manage projects. It will allow students to develop not only practical expertise but also a critical faculty for evaluating their relative merits. The students will have access to applications widely used in the language industries for TM management, TD management, project management, translation of documentation, software localisation and subtitle translation. The course will focus on a critical appraisal of the usefulness and usability of the tools and students are encouraged to contribute to the course by bringing to the class their own surveys and investigations into the use of tools relevant to translation technology course.

The development of technology has made it imperative for translators to be familiar with current translation software. This component of translation technology in addition to the existing two programme components of translation theory and translation practice will enable students to improve both their translation efficiency and translation quality, and hence considerably increase their competitiveness in today’s job market.

Topics to be covered include:
  1. Introduction to MT and online MT tools as an aid to translators
  2. Translation memory (TM) & TM management
  3. Terminology database (TD) & TD management
  4. Translation projects management
  5. Corpora (monolingual, parallel bilingual and comparable) as an aid to translators
  6. Principles and skills in localization (software and websites)
  7. Principles and skills in subtitle creation and translation
  8. Critical evaluation of MT and CAT tools
  9. Translation technology and freelance translators
  10. Critical review of translation technology and its trend
Major software, programmes and applications involved:
  1. SDL Trados Studio 2009
  2. SDL Trados 2007: WinAlign
  3. SDL Multiterm 2009
  4. SDL Multiterm 2009 Convert
  5. SDL Multiterm 2009 Extract
  6. Déjà Vu X2
  7. SDL Passolo
  8. Sisulizer 2010
  9. Alchemy Catalyst 9.0
  10. British National Corpus
  11. AntConc
  12. The subtitling set

Method of assessment

One essay of 3,000 words to be submitted on the day of teaching, week 1, term 2 (35%); one essay of 2,500 words to be submitted on the day of teaching, week 7, term 2 (25%); one essay of 4,000 words to be submitted on the day of teaching, week 1, term 3 (40%).

Suggested reading

  1. Austermühl, F. (2001). Electronic Tools for Translators - Translation Practices Explained. Manchester and MA: St. Jerome Publishing.
  2. Bowker, L. (2002). Computer-aided Translation Technology: A Practical Introduction. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press.
  3. Bowker, L. and Pearson, J. (2002). Working with Specialized Language: A Practical Guide to Using Corpora. London: Routledge.
  4. Díaz Cintas, J. and Remael, A. (2007). Audiovisual Translation: Subtitling. Manchester and MA: St. Jerome Publishing.
  5. Esselink, B. (2000). A Practical Guide to Localization. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  6. Nirengurg, S., Somers, H. and Wilks, Y. (2003). Readings in machine translation. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
  7. Robert, C. S. and Jaroniec, S. (Eds.). (2001). Translating into Success: Cutting-edge Strategies for Going Multilingual in a Global Age. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  8. Sager, J. C. (1990). A Practical Course in Terminology Processing. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  9. Tennent, M. (Ed.). (2005). Training for the New Millennium: Pedagogies for Translation and Interpreting. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  10. Teresa Cabre, M. (1999). Terminology: Theory, Methods, and Applications. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Other Reference Books
  1. Chan, S. W. (2006). A Dictionary of Translation Technology. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press.
  2. Chan, S. W. (2008). A Topical Bibliography of Computer (-aided) Translation. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press.
  3. Somers, H. (Ed.). (2003). Computers and Translation: a Translator's Guide. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
  4. Zanettin, F., Bernardini, S. and Stewart, D. (Eds.). (2003). Corpora in Translator Education. Manchester and MA: St. Jerome Pub