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Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Near and Middle East

Israel, the Arab World and the Palestinians

Course Code:
15PNMC038
Unit value:
1
Taught in:
Full Year

This course provides a historical overview of the Israel-Palestine conflict and examines its political, social and cultural reflections, from late Ottoman Palestine to the present day. Alongside the political history, the course will emphasise social and cultural aspects of the conflict. It will bring a variety of voices and perspectives, often contradictory, on the conflict, its underlying causes and dynamics; these perspectives include not only the two “official” narratives, the Israeli and the Palestinian, but also voices “from below” of marginalised groups. Attention will be given to groups whose position does not fit easily with the official narratives: local Jewish communities in Palestine, Arab Palestinian collaborators with the British and the Zionists, Middle Eastern Jews in Israel, and Palestinian citizens of Israel. Architecture, visual art, film, novellas and poems will be discussed as means to analyse and understand the conflict.

Prerequisites

 An interest in the subject and a desire to learn more.

Objectives and learning outcomes of the course

At the end of the course the student will have a clear idea of the complexity of the Arab-Palestinian conflict and a sure grasp of the history of the Jewish community in Palestine starting with the so-called Old Yishuv and then through the period of the Aliyyot and through to the subsequent  history of the State of Israel from 1948 until  the present.  The student will be able to see the conflict from a number of perspectives which may challenge  previous assumptions and will have a clear sense of how the differing strands of Zionism impacted upon Israeli policies and development.  She/he will have a sense of the way in which this conflict has marked the development of Israeli and Palestinian societies and cultures and will have knowledge of a number of cultural artefacts expressing the impact of the conflict.  

Workload

A total of 22 weeks teaching with 3 hours classroom contact per week.

Scope and syllabus

This course shares teaching hours with the BA course in Israeli history and the Israeli-Palestine conflict. Two hours of teaching are shared with BA students and there is one additional hour of Masters-tailored tuition per week.

Course outline
  • The Palestine-Israel conflict: narratives, memories, histories
  • Late Ottoman Palestine and the origins of Arab Nationalism
  • Zionism and Palestine’s Jewish communities, the early encounters between Zionists and Arabs
  • World War I – local viewpoints, Imperial viewpoints: Sykes Piccot and the Balfour Declaration
  • The British Mandate of Palestine: British visions for Jerusalem
  • The Arab Revolt: political violence during the Mandate
  • Arab-Jewish interaction: engagement, collaboration, conflict
  • The End of the Mandate – prosperity, terror, illegal immigration and political confusion
  • 1948: Palestine’s Nakba and Israel’s War of Independence
  • The enduring scars of 1948 in cultural memory: the stories of Ghassan Kanafani and A.B. Yehoshua
  • Israel between 1948 and 1967: the immigration of Middle Eastern and North African Jews and the question of Mizrahim (“Arab Jews”)
  • The birth of the PLO and the Armed Struggle
  • 1967 and Greater Israel: Israeli settlers in the Occupied Territories
  • The first Palestinian uprising, the Intifada (1987-1991); Mahmoud Darwish and Etgar Keret
  • The Oslo Accords; the global and local context of the peace process
  • Palestinian citizens of Israel
  • Religious Fundamentalism in Israel and Palestine
  • From Rabin’s assassination to the second Intifada; the collapse of the peace process
  • Israel: Apartheid State or the Only Democracy in the Middle East? The debate on the “end of the two state solution”
  • Film screening: Arna’s children (2003, Juliano Mer Khamis)

Method of assessment

Assessment is by written examination in May-June (50% of the total mark) and coursework. The coursework consists of two essays each of 3500 words, each counting for 25% of the total mark, to be submitted on Day 1, Term 2 and Day 1, Term 3 respectively.

Suggested reading

  • Gelvin, J.L., 2007. The Israel-Palestine conflict: one hundred years of war, Cambridge University Press.
  • Smith, C.D., 2009. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A History with Documents, Bedford/St. Martin’s.
  • Tamari, S., 2009. Mountain against the sea: essays on Palestinian society and culture, University of California Press.
  • Shindler, C., 2008. A history of modern Israel 1st ed., Cambridge [u.a.]: Cambridge Univ. Press.
  • Pappe, I., 1999. The Israel/Palestine question, London: Routledge.
  • Kimmerling, B. & Migdal, J.S., 2003. The Palestinian People: A History, Cambridge: Harvard University Press
  • Sachar, H.M., 1996. A History of Israel: From the Rise of Zionism to Our Time (Second Edition, Revised and Updated) 2nd ed., Knopf.
  • Morris, B., 1999. Righteous victims : a history of the Zionist-Arab conflict, 1881-1999 1st ed., New York: Knopf.
  • Khalidi, R. , 2006. The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle Forstatehood, Boston: Beacon Press.