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Department of Politics and International Studies

International migration and diaspora politics

Course Code:
15PPOH012
Unit value:
0.5
Taught in:
Term 2

This course examines international migration and diaspora politics as transnational processes in world politics. Cross-border mobility and diasporic political projects are key features of the contemporary international environment, yet they remain undertheorized in International Relations. How do migration and diaspora politics inform or challenge our understandings of the state, national identity, sovereignty, and the nature of the international system? What is the relationship between international migration and key areas of concern for International Relations scholars such as economic development, diplomacy, international security and global normative contestation? A range of theoretical approaches and empirical examples will be covered

Objectives and learning outcomes of the course

At the end of the course, a student should be able to demonstrate…

  • An understanding of academic literatures and debates on international migration and diaspora politics
  • An understanding of the relationship between international migration and diaspora politics and the discipline of international relations
  • The ability to present theories, models and approaches that help students to explain and understand the international dynamics of migration and diaspora politics
  • The ability to discuss international migration and diaspora politics as they relate to various subfields in IR and Poltiical Science, including the study of International Political Economy, International Security, International Development, Political Institutions and Political Participation, and Identity Politics
  • The ability to undertake an independent research project focusing on an aspect of international migration and diaspora politics
  • The ability to critically engage with the academic and policy literature in migration studies
  • The ability to present and critiques competing scholarly arguments
  • The ability to make formal presentations

Method of assessment

Assessment is 90% coursework (in the form of one 6000 word essay) and 10% practical examination - all coursework is resubmissable