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Centre of Islamic Studies

Minority Legal Orders: Islamic Law in Secular Liberal Democracies

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED
Maleiha Malik (King's College)

Date: 15 January 2014Time: 1:00 PM

Finishes: 15 January 2014Time: 2:00 PM

Venue: Russell Square: College BuildingsRoom: G 51

Type of Event: Seminar

Series: CIS Seminar Series

Minority Legal Orders: Islamic Law in Secular Liberal Democracies

In Minority Legal Orders in the UK: Pluralism, Minorities and the Law, Maleiha Malik argues that a liberal democracy such as the UK has a responsibility to consider the rights and needs of those from minority groups who want to make legal decisions in tune with their culture and beliefs; it also has a responsibility to protect those ‘minorities within minorities’ who are vulnerable to pressure to comply with the norms of their social group.

Minority Legal Orders in the UK: Pluralism, Minorities and the Law discusses the origins of minority legal orders in the UK and defi nes what constitutes a minority legal order in a liberal democracy. Finally, the overview explores the advantages and disadvantages of the practical ways in which the state can respond to and work with minority legal orders in the UK, and identifi es the gaps in the research around them.

Professor Maleiha Malik

Maleiha Malik is a Professor in Law. She studied law at the University of London and University of Oxford. She is a barrister and a member of the Honourable Society of Gray’s Inn. Maleiha Malik’s research focuses on the theory and practice of discrimination law. She has written extensively on discrimination law, minority protection and feminist theory. She is the co-author of a leading text titled Discrimination Law: Theory and Practice which was published in 2008. She is, along with Dr Jon Wilson from the Department of History at KCL, the co-ordinator of the AHRC project on ‘Traditions in the Present’ which explores the relevance of 'tradition' in contemporary societies. Maleiha Malik's current research focuses on the intersection between sexual and cultural equality, and it explores the adjustments that may need to be made to feminist theory to accommodate increasing cultural pluralism. She teaches courses in Jurisprudence and Legal Theory, Discrimination Law and European Law to undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Contact email: cis@soas.ac.uk