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School of Law

MA in International Law

Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only)


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Minimum Entry Requirements: Upper second class honours preferably in a related discipline

Start of programme: September intake only

The MA in International Law allows students to study international law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including commerce, criminal law, humanitarian law, environmental law, and human rights. All SOAS courses are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on courses offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.


To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Law and Legal Methods Pre-sessional Course in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take courses equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Courses or the following courses associated with the International Law specialisation:

Full Course Units (1.0)
Half Course Units (0.5)
 Dissertation (1.0)

 Please note: Not all courses listed may be available every year.

A Student's Perspective

I enjoyed the availability of a diverse range of units – something that you might not be able to get anywhere else. Also, the knowledge of the lecturers, particularly Diamond Ashiagbor, was incredible. In seminars, you would just get the feeling that she knew everything she was talking about and could answer any question.

Joshua Tan, Monash University