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London Middle East Institute

Occupying Syria under the French Mandate: Insurgency, Space and State Formation

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED
Dan Neep, University of Exeter and Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL)

Date: 11 December 2012Time: 5:45 PM

Finishes: 11 December 2012Time: 7:00 PM

Venue: Russell Square: College BuildingsRoom: Khalili Lecture Theatre

Type of Event: Book Launch

Series: Lecture Programme on the Contemporary Middle East

Book launch and talk to mark the publication of Neep's recent book Occupying Syria under the French Mandate: Insurgency, Space and State Formation (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

What role does military force play during a colonial occupation? The answer seems obvious: coercion crushes local resistance, quashes political dissent and consolidates the dominance of the occupying power. Yet violence also has more ambiguous consequences. In 1920s Syria, the main objective of the colonial state was to crush armed Syrian insurgents and the population that supported them, but these military practices fundamentally transformed how the colonial state organised, controlled and understood Syrian society, geography and population. Colonial state formation in Syria was not just shaped by the politics of conquest, but warped by specific practices of occupation, patterned violence and spatial order.

Chair: Charles Tripp, SOAS

Organiser: London Middle East Institute

Contact email: vp6@soas.ac.uk

Contact Tel: 020 7898 4490