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A conversation with Luo Dajun and other international playwrights on Culture differences, cultural diversity, culture clash

A conversation with Luo Dajun and other international playwrights on Culture differences, cultural diversity, culture clash

18 May 2014

A conversation with Luo Dajun and other international playwrights on cultural differences, cultural diversity, cultural clash was held in SOAS on 18th May, in which the theatre enthusiasts had a chance to meet and communicate with Chinese, British and Israeli playwrights.  It was organised by UK Research and Development Centre for Chinese Traditional Culture and co-organised by London Confucius Institute.

In the first session, Luo Dajun, a famous playwright at the National Theatre of China, introduced the origins, development and evolution of the Chinese play, and the influence of classical plays from other countries. He also pointed out the problems that Chinese theatre is facing and his understanding and reflections on it. He emphasised that the Chinese theatre must have its own elements when it performs western plays. He thinks that when playwrights start with a classic play, they should add some aspects of their own culture, but in a way that is readily understood by the audience.

In the second session the audience was invited to discuss with the famous playwrights from China, Britain and Israel their view on writing the new script for the play Love and Death.

Lisa Goldman, the Artistic Director and Joint Chief Executive of Soho Theatre, said that her career in the theatre started from writing new plays and she is looking forwards to working alongside Chinese playwrights.

Joshua Sobol, the famous Israel playwright, thought that the play represents a social phenomenon and when he works with playwrights from other countries it broadens his horizons.

Over 80 people were there and joined in the conversation. The audience and playwrights interacted and discussed matters concerning cultural diversity in the theatre. They are all are waiting with anticipation of the opening of Love and Death.