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Centre of Jaina Studies

International Journal of Jaina Studies (IJJS) Archive 2009

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IJJS 5.1 Cort, An Epitome of Medieval Śvetāmbara Literary Culture: A Review and Study of Jinaratnasūri’s Līlāvatīsāra

Author: John E. Cort
Year: 2009
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 5, No. 1 (2009) 1-33

Abstract

The Līlāvatīsāra was composed in 1285 C.E. by the Kharatara Gaccha monk and author Jinaratnasūri.  It presents a nested set of tales that trace the effects of karma over multiple lifetimes.  Each set of tales ends with the fictive hearer of the tales realizing the evanescence of material life, and as a result renouncing the world to become a Jain monk.  On the basis of the single extant manuscript copied in ca. 1350, and now in Jaisalmer, Richard C. C. Fynes re-edited and translated the text for the Clay Sanskrit Library.  After reviewing Fynes’s translation, this article details the Khartara Gaccha “writer’s workshop” of which Jinaratnasūri was an important participant.  The article argues that the extensive production of literature by these Kharatara Gaccha monks, as well as the medieval monks of the Tapā Gaccha, played a major role in the rise of these lineages to prominence in medieval Śvetāmbara Jain society in western India.

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Indian Influence on Mani Reconsidered: The Case of Jainism

Authors: Max Deeg & Iain Gardner
Year: 2009
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 5, No. 2 (2009) 1-30

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How Not to Install an Image of the Jina: An Early Anti-Paurṇamīyaka Diatribe

Author: Paul Dundas
Year: 2009
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 5, No. 3 (2009) 1-23

Abstract

Image installation (pratiṣṭhā), a central ritual of Jainism, of necessity requires the cooperative participation of monk and layman. The twelfth century Śvetāmbara teacher Candraprabhasūri, credited with initiating the Paurṇamīyaka Gaccha, apparently criticised the role of the monk in empowering an image of a Jina, apparently on the grounds that monks cannot engage in physical worship (dravyapūjā) of any iconic representation. This paper analyses the systematic riposte to this position by Ajitadevasūri of the Bṛhad Gaccha in his Mohonmūlanavādasthānaka of 1128. 

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