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Department of Anthropology and Sociology

Dr Stephen P Hughes

BA (Bates College, Lewiston) MA PhD (Chicago)

Overview

Stephen Hughes
Department of Anthropology and Sociology

Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology

Centre for Media Studies

Associate Member, Centre for Media and Film Studies

SOAS South Asia Institute

Academic Staff, SOAS South Asia Institute

Name:
Dr Stephen P Hughes
Email address:
Telephone:
020 7898 4070
Address:
SOAS, University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG
Building:
Russell Square: College Buildings
Office No:
558
Office Hours:
Wednesdays 9-11am

Biography

My research is at the intersection of anthropology, history, religion and media and film studies. Tamil-speaking south India is my main ethnographic and linguistic area of specialization. I have lived and worked in south India for over six years since 1987 on various research projects relating to the history and ethnography of media including Tamil cinema, film exhibition, film music, gramophone, radio, popular publishing, election campaigns and the emergence of satellite TV. I also have strong interests in visual anthropology including documentary and ethnographic film and photography.

Teaching

Programmes Convened
Courses Taught
PhD Students supervised
  • Bryony Whitmarsh, 'The Narayanhiti Palace Museum: Memory, Power and National Identity'
  • Carl Rommel, The Cultural Work that Football Does: interrogating emotionality, infrastructures and subjectivities along circulations of Egypt’s changing national game (working title)
  • Eleanor Halsall, The Indo-German beginnings of Bombay Talkies, 1925-1939
  • Georgie Carroll, How are water and aquatic fauna fetishised in Sanskrit courtly literature, and to what extent does this erotic language politicise 'love' and 'the body' and reinforce sacred kingship?
  • Helen Underhill,
  • Jas Kaur, (Working title) Ethnicity, coups and the ethnographic present in Fiji.
  • Nafsika Papacharalampous, The Metamorphosis of the Greek Cuisine: National identity, tradition, heritage and memory as narratives of change from the Athens Market (working title).
  • Sahil Khan Warsi, Cultivating Hambastagi and Hamdardi: Personhood and Relatedness among Afghans in India (Working Title)
  • Seamus Murphy, 'Power, Development Discourses, and Food Security; the changing entitlements of Lake Chilwa’s resource-users'.
  • Sylvia Simpson, Japanese Women in the UK and their Media (working title)
  • Taha Kazi, Pious Entertainment – Changing Forms and Notions of Piety in Pakistan
  • Thomas van der Molen, Navigating Sovereignties: Social Navigation among Young Undocumented Tibetans in Nepal
  • Tung-Yi KHO,

Research

My work clusters around three main research areas broadly relating to the history of media in south India- 1) early film audience and exhibition; 2) musical performance and the emergence of sound media; and 3) religion, media and politics.

One area of research interest concerns the social and cultural history of silent cinema audiences in south India from multiple perspectives. Chronologically, this work covers the beginnings of commercial cinema in south India from its introduction by touring exhibitors at the turn of the twentieth century until the transition to sound films and the emergence of a distinctly Tamil cinema in the 1930s. Within this period I have examined the leading institutions, practices and discourses that variously defined the rapidly shifting conditions of audience composition and the film-going experience. The overall purpose of this work has been to rethink critically the historiography of early cinema in India through an investigation of its audiences. Conventional approaches to the history of cinema in India have consisted of an exclusive emphasis on the pioneering efforts of film production, film stars and classic films texts with little or no effort to consider the broader social and cultural conditions, which preceded and exceeded the films themselves. Therefore, in shifting this historiographic emphasis, I developed original ethnographic and historical research into a general approach for the study of cinema audiences. I treat audiences as people who attended the cinema and as abstracted social categories, both variously constituted through exhibition practices, government regulation, film genres, public debate and experiences of film-going.

My second research concentration focuses on the historical conjuncture of sound and modernity in south India. The overall argument is that, in contrast to a Euro-American association of vision/visuality with modernity, sound is the dominant sense of cultural modernity in south India. This work considers how over the first half of the 20th century the introduction of new sound media- harmonium, gramophone, radio, loud speakers and cinema- placed music at the centre of south Indian debates about modernity and reconfigured notions of the public and public space through new practices of sound broadcasting and listening.

The third area of research was started as part of my contributions to the collaborative research project I was part of at the University of Amsterdam- Modern Mass Media, Religion and Imagination of Communities: Different Postcolonial Trajectories in West Africa, India, Brazil and the Caribbean (see www.pscw.uva.nl/media-religion). As part of this project I developed a line of research using the study of Tamil cinema to address questions about the changing relations among mass media, religion and politics in south India. I have been working on an episodic history concentrating upon a series of key films and debates in the changing religious and political equation around Tamil cinema. Specifically I have followed the political debates surrounding initial religious orientation of Indian silent cinema through to its transformation into a Tamil film genre with the introduction of cinema sound in the 1930s. As Tamil cinema developed into a south Indian regional and linguistically defined sub-national film making tradition, Hindu mythological and devotional films featured prominently in a major realignment within south Indian cultural politics of modernity.

Expertise

For help in contacting SOAS academics and advice on services to business and the community, please contact SOAS Enterprise on +44(0)20 7898 4837 or email enterprise@soas.ac.uk.
For all press and media enquiries please call +44 (0)20 7898 4135 or email comms@soas.ac.uk

Available for
  • TV
  • Radio
  • Press
  • Briefings
  • Special Study Programmes
  • Short Term Consultancy
  • Long Term Consultancy
Regional Expertise
  • South Asia
Country Expertise
  • India
  • Sri Lanka
Languages
  • Tamil

Publications

Book Chapters

Hughes, Stephen (2011) 'What is Tamil About Tamil Cinema?' In: Dickey, Sara and Dudrah, Rajinder, (eds.), South Asian Cinemas: Widening the Lens. Routledge.

Hughes, Stephen (2011) 'Media anthropology and the problem of audience reception.' In: Ruby, Jay and Banks, Marcus, (eds.), Made to be Seen: Perspectives on the History of Visual Anthropology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hughes, Stephen (2011) 'Film genre, exhibition and audiences in colonial south India.' In: Maltby, Richard and Biltereyst, Daniel and Meers, Philippe, (eds.), Explorations in New Cinema History: Approaches and Case Studies. London: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 295-309.

Hughes, Stephen (2009) 'Tamil mythological cinema and the politics of secular modernism.' In: Meyer, Birgit, (ed.), Aesthetic Formations: Media, Religion, and the Senses. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 93-116. (Forthcoming)

Hughes, Stephen (2006) 'Urban mobility and early cinema in Chennai.' In: Venkatachalapathy, A. R., (ed.), Chennai Not Madras: Perspectives on the City. Marg Publications, pp. 39-48.

Hughes, Stephen (2000) 'Policing silent film exhibition in colonial south India.' In: Vasudevan, Ravi, (ed.), Making Meaning in Indian Cinema. Oxford University Press, pp. 33-64.

Articles

Hughes, Stephen (2011) 'Five Short of Centenary.' The Hindu . p. 1.

Hughes, Stephen (2010) 'What is Tamil about Tamil Cinema?' South Asia Popular Culture, 8 (3). pp. 213-229.

Hughes, Stephen (2010) 'Our tryst with celluloid magic.' The Hindu - Sunday Magazine . p. 1.

Hughes, Stephen (2010) 'When Film Came to Madras.' BioScope: South Asian Screen Studies, 1 (2). pp. 147-168.

Hughes, Stephen (2010) 'The Sound of RMRL.' Maatruveli Aayvitazh, 4 . pp. 76-81.

Hughes, Stephen (2010) 'In search of beginnings...' The Hindu - Sunday Magazine . p. 5.

Hughes, Stephen (2010) 'The Lost Decade of Indian Film History.' Journal of the Moving Image, 9 . pp. 72-93.

Hughes, Stephen (2007) 'Music in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Drama, Gramophone and the Beginnings of Tamil Cinema.' The Journal of Asian Studies, 66 (1). pp. 3-34.

Hughes, Stephen (2006) 'House Full: Silent Film Genre, Exhibition and Audiences in South India.' Indian Economic & Social History Review, 43 (1). pp. 31-62.

Hughes, Stephen (2005) 'Mythologicals and Modernity: Contesting Silent Cinema in South India.' Postscripts: The Journal of Sacred Texts and Contemporary Worlds, 1 (2-3). pp. 207-35.

Hughes, Stephen and Meyer, B (2005) 'Introduction: Mediating Religion and Film in a Post-secular World.' Postscripts: The Journal of Sacred Texts and Contemporary Worlds, 1, no. . pp. 149-153.

Hughes, Stephen (2003) 'Pride of Place: rethinking exhibition for the study of cinema in India.' Seminar: The Monthly Symposium, 525 . pp. 28-32.

Hughes, Stephen (2002) 'The 'Music Boom' in Tamil South India: Gramophone, Radio and the Making of Mass Culture.' Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, 22 (4). pp. 445-73.

Hughes, Stephen (1996) 'The Pre-Phalke era in South India: Reflections on the formation of film audiences in Madras.' South Indian Studies, 2 . pp. 161-204.

Hughes, Stephen (1996) 'Madras Cinema Audiences in the 1920s: a sociological approach.' Kalaccuvatu, 16 . pp. 19-25.

This list was generated on Wed Oct 1 01:26:19 2014 BST.