SOAS University of London

Accommodation

Information for Parents

As a parent, guardian or supporter, watching your child leave for university can be a nerve-wracking experience. London offers a wide range of accommodation choices which can seem daunting at first glance, but supporting your child to make an informed decision about where to live that they are comfortable with can ensure that they get off to a great start at SOAS.  

Choosing accommodation

Whilst many students choose to live in halls of residence in their first year, many new students prefer to live elsewhere – at home, in private rented accommodation or with a host family for a variety of different reasons. Consideration cost of accommodation, location, quality as well as personal preference is key to supporting a decision.

A parents’ guide to Student Housing (via the Guardian)

Lots of house hunting information is available in the University of London Private Housing Guide

When to Apply


March – Applications  open for SOAS Halls of residences
May – University of London Housing Fair.  A mix of university managed properties and accredited private rented properties will also be made available online if you are unable to attend
Early September – Waiting list opens for SOAS and University of London Halls of Residence
Private rented properties are usually advertised 4-8 weeks before they become available – see our advice pages for more information.

Being a guarantor

It is common practice for private London Landlords to ask for a guarantor to underwrite the cost of a tenancy. Most expect the guarantor to be based in the UK, and may charge up to 6 months’ rent in advance if the tenant is unable to provide this, which can leave the tenant in a vulnerable position. There are properties that do not require a guarantor, such as the SOAS supported Student Homes managed by the University of London. 

If you are acting as a guarantor for an individual contract between your child/a tenant and the landlord, then you only have liability for that contract, however if  a joint contract has been signed, you may potentially find yourself liable for the bills and rents of other tenants. If you are not happy with the guarantor form provided by the landlord, you can ask them to limit the liability to one tenant.  


Student Housing: What you need to know as a guarantor (via The Guardian)