SOAS University of London

Amrit Kaur Lohia

SOAS is unique but incredibly inclusive. Everyone fits in somewhere, and your perspective is valued by fellow students and lecturers, who are all eager to absorb what you have to say.

Studying history at SOAS made me realise how connected the world really is and how important it is to study ‘the other side of the world’.

It’s been a life-changing experience — from allowing me to humanise history and understand universal human experience, to redefining my own identity as a member of the South Asian/Sikh diaspora.

SOAS is unique but incredibly inclusive. Everyone fits in somewhere, and your perspective is valued by fellow students and lecturers, who are all eager to absorb what you have to say. SOAS is known for being politicised and a hub for social action, but it also has an unmatched ethos and culture.

As an ambassador for various national and international charities - I have always plastered SOAS all over my speeches, networking events and persuaded every 18 year old I've met to come to an open day - all quite naturally as it has come to define me!

The School awarded me SOAS Volunteer of the Year 2012, and it is this very culture that has nurtured my thinking, allowing me to be open-minded and free-spirited — empowering me on so many levels.

I knew I had to stay on for an MA. My ambition is to take this education beyond the confines of academic institutions and use it for social action. 'The SOAS education' is absent from national curriculums in schools in the UK. I only ever learnt a eurocentric perspective, like the other side of the world didn't exist. As a youth worker, I want to empower the young people I work with - through the humanised history I have been exposed to at SOAS.