SOAS University of London

Malebo Boshiane

In many ways, the course has been different to what I expected: it has overturned many assumptions; come up with searching questions about food; and made me think about things I haven’t thought before.

My career started first in Social Work, in South Africa, and then for the last sixteen years in the UK. Through my work, I became interested in Mental Health issues relating to food, and I wanted to pursue this further as an academic subject. I searched online for Food Anthropology, and up came SOAS! 

In many ways, the course has been different to what I expected: it has overturned many assumptions; come up with searching questions about food; and made me think about things I haven’t thought before.

I am continuing to work and study at the same time, which is quite demanding, and so the thing I have compromised on is spending social time with my fellow students. If I have a criticism of the course it is that it is too self-directed, particularly for someone like myself, who is new to anthropology, and I would like to see far wider theoretical African influences in the curriculum.

Ultimately, though, SOAS has reinforced my interest in issues surrounding food, and I would like to be able to use this as a stepping stone to PhD in Health and Wellbeing.