SOAS University of London

Department of Anthropology and Sociology

MA Anthropological Research Methods (2018 entry)

duration:
1 year full-time or 2/3 years part-time. The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework.

Fees 2018/19

UK/EU fees:
£9,225
Overseas fees:
£18,980

Fees for 2018/19 entrants. This is a Band 1 fee. The fees are per academic year. Please note that fees go up each year. Further details can be found in the Fees and Funding tab on this page or in the Registry Postgraduate Tuition Fees page

Entry requirements

  • Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in Social Anthropology. This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in Social Anthropology. Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

Featured events

  • Overview
  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Fees and funding
  • Employment
  • Apply

Overview

Start of programme: September

Mode of Attendance: Full-time or Part-time

The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

Learn about the modules (courses) for this programme

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

  • Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
  • Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

  • Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.
  • Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

  • Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
  • Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
  • The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
  • Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
  • Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
    Language training.

Convenors

Structure

Learn a language as part of this programme

Degree programmes at SOAS - including this one - can include language courses in more than forty African and Asian languages. It is SOAS students’ command of an African or Asian language which sets SOAS apart from other universities.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits: 90 credits of modules and a dissertation of 15,000 words at 90 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed below and must participate in the Research Training Seminar. 

All students are required to take 30 credits from the Anthropology and Sociology list.

The remaining credits can be selected the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or relevant options from other departments or a language module.

Programme Detail

Dissertation

All students are required to take the compulsory dissertation module worth 60 credits.

Module Code Credits Term Availability
Dissertation in Anthropological Research Methods (90) 15PANC995 Full Year
Taught Component
Module Code Credits Term Availability
Research Methods in Anthropology 15PANC011 30 Full Year
AND

All students are expected to attend the MPhil Training Seminar. This will not count towards your 180 credits.

AND
Guided Option

Choose a module(s) from the List of Modules below to the value of 30 credits

AND

Choose a module(s) from the List of Modules below to the value of 30 credits

OR

Choose a module(s) from Listed Options from other departments below to the value of 30 credits

OR

Language Component

Choose Postgraduate Language modules to the value of 30 credits

List of Modules (subject to availability)
Module Code Credits Term Availability
African and Asian Cultures in Britain 15PANH009 15 Term 2 Not Running 2018/2019
African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World 15PANH010 15 Term 1
African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World 15PANC012 30 Full Year
Anthropological approaches to agriculture, food and nutrition 15PANH053 15 Term 2 Not Running 2018/2019
Anthropology of Development 15PANC090 30 Full Year
The Anthropology of Food 15PANC013 30 Full Year
Anthropology of Globalisation (PG) 15PANH061 15 Term 2 Not Running 2018/2019
Anthropology of Human Rights (PG) 15PANH058 15 Term 1
Anthropology of Travel and Tourism 15PANC098 30 Full Year Not Running 2018/2019
Anthropology of Law 15PANH056 15 Term 2 Not Running 2018/2019
Anthropology of Travel and Tourism 15PANC098 30 Full Year Not Running 2018/2019
Comparative Studies of Society and Culture 15PANC073 30 Full Year
Comparative Media Studies 15PANC009 30 Full Year Not Running 2018/2019
Comparative Media Theory 15PANH028 15 Term 1 Not Running 2018/2019
Culture and Society of China 15PANH062 15 Term 2
Culture and Society of East Africa 15PANH063 15 Term 2
Culture and Society of Japan 15PANH065 15 Term 1
Culture and Society of South Asia 15PANH064 15 Term 1
Culture and Society of South East Asia 15PANH066 15 Term 2
Culture and Society of Near and Middle East 15PANH067 15 Term 2
Medical Anthropology in Global Perspective 15PANC093 30 Full Year
Issues in Anthropology and Film 15PANH022 15 Term 1
Issues in Mind, Culture and Psychiatry 15PANH032 15 Term 2
Issues in the Anthropology of Gender 15PANH024 15 Term 2
Media Production Skills 15PANH050 15 Term 2
Perspectives On Development 15PANH033 15 Term 1
Religions on the move: New Currents and Emerging Trends in Global Religion 15PANH055 15 Term 1
Therapy and Culture 15PANH027 15 Term 1
Tourism and Travel: A Global Perspective 15PANH059 15 Term 1 Not Running 2018/2019

 

This is the structure for applicants

If you are a current student you can find structure information on Moodle or through your Department.

Programme Specification

Important notice

The information on the programme page reflects the intended programme structure against the given academic session. Please read the important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules.

Teaching and Learning

Timetable

..

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Anthropology of Travel and Tourism, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date).  Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Contact Hours

All Masters programmes consist of 180 credits, made up of taught modules of 30 or 15 credits, taught over 10 or 20 weeks, and a dissertation of 90 credits. The programme structure shows which modules are compulsory and which optional.

As a rough guide, 1 credit equals approximately 10 hours of work. Most of this will be independent study, including reading and research, preparing coursework, revising for examinations and so on. It will also include class time, which may include lectures, seminars and other classes. Some subjects, such as learning a language, have more class time than others. At SOAS, most postgraduate modules have a one hour lecture and a one hour seminar every week, but this does vary.

More information is on the page for each module.

Fees and funding

Tuition Fees

Full details of postgraduate tuition fees can be found on the Registry's Postgraduate Tuition Fees page.

This is a Band 1 tuition fee.

Fees for 2018/19 entrants. The fees below are per academic year. Please note that fees go up each year. 

Full-time Part-time 2 Years Part-time 3 Years
UK/EU
Students
Overseas
Students
UK/EU
Students
Overseas
Students
UK/EU
Students
Overseas
Students
£9,225 £18,980 £4,613 £9,490 £3,075 £6,327
Scholarships
Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Studentships

ESRC

Application Deadline: 2018-01-09 16:00

Felix Non- Indian Scholarship

Application Deadline: 2018-01-29 00:00

Felix Scholarships

Application Deadline: 2018-01-29 00:00

John Loiello AFSOAS FISH Scholarship

Application Deadline: 2018-02-20 17:00

SOAS Master's Scholarships

Application Deadline: 2018-02-20 17:00

Sasakawa Postgraduate Studentship

Application Deadline: 2018-02-20 17:00

Tibawi Trust Award

Application Deadline: 2018-06-19 17:00

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section

Employment

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.  

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website.

A Student's Perspective

SOAS creates a unique atmosphere that I have never tasted before. I truly love the SOAS community, or what I termed anthropologically as ‘SOAS-ism’.

Hang Wang

Apply

Find out more

  • Contact us
    By phone:
    +44 (0)20 7898 4700
    By email:
    study@soas.ac.uk
  • Got a question?

    If you still have questions about this programme or studying at SOAS get in touch.

    Ask a question

  • Apply

    Postgraduate programme applications should be made through our online application system.

    Start your application