SOAS University of London

Department of Anthropology and Sociology

MRes Social Anthropology (2020 entry)

Previously 'MA Anthropological Research Methods'

  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Employment

Overview

The MRes Social Anthropology offers students training in social science research methods, with a strong focus on ethnographic methods. It aims to provide students with the skills they need to conduct research at a doctoral level, or to work as social science researchers. In addition to the acquisition of strong methodological skills, students are able to benefit from SOAS' renowned offering of African and Asian languages, as well as its expertise in the humanities, including philosophy, linguistics, literature, and history.

Why study MRes Social Anthropology at SOAS

  • our Anthropology Department is ranked 5th in the UK and 13th in the world in the 2020 QS World University Rankings
  • we draw on the exceptional regional expertise of our academics in Asian, African, and Middle Eastern languages and politics, many of whom have joined us with a practical working knowledge of their disciplines
  • you will be joining our thriving community of alumni and academics who have an impact on the world outside of academia
  • you will be able to flexibly structure your programme using our programme optional modules and/or our Open Options modules from other departments, including the opportunity to learn a regional language
  • we are specialists in the delivery of languages. Your command of a language at SOAS will set you apart from graduates of other universities

The MRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Aims and Outcomes

The MRes is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

  • have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools
  • have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

  • interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing
  • social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

  • ethnographic methods and participant observation
  • ethical and legal issues in anthropological research
  • the logistics of long-term fieldwork
  • familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures
  • writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
  • Language training

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings

Start of programme: September

Mode of Attendance: Full-time or Part-time

Entry requirements

  • We will consider all applications with 2:ii (or international equivalent) or higher. In addition to degree classification we take into account other elements of the application including supporting statement and references.

Featured events

duration:
1 year full-time or 2/3 years part-time. The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework.

Convenors

Structure

Learn a language as part of this programme

Degree programmes at SOAS - including this one - can include language courses in more than forty African and Asian languages. It is SOAS students’ command of an African or Asian language which sets SOAS apart from other universities.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits: 90 credits of modules and a dissertation of 15,000 words at 90 credits.

All students are expected to take the following three modules: a. Research Methods in Anthropology, b. the MRes Training Seminar, and c. Epigeum- Statistical Methods for Research – Social Sciences.

All students are required to take 30 credits from the Anthropology and Sociology list.

The remaining credits can be selected the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or relevant options from other departments or a language module.

Programme Detail

Taught Component
Compulsory Modules

All students take 45 credits compulsory modules:

Module Code Credits Term
801 Research Methods in Anthropology 15PANH091 15 Term 1
802 Research Training Seminar 15PANH092 0 Full Year
All students choose 30 credits from List C or any module from the School Open Options List or a language

Dissertation

All students enrol in the dissertation module:

Module Code Credits Term
799B Dissertation (MRes) in Anthropology 15PANC995 90 Full Year
List of Modules (subject to availability)
Anthropology and Sociology
Module Code Credits Term
725 African and Asian Diasporas: Culture, Politics, Identities 15PANH085 15 Term 2
724 Migration, Borders and Space: Decolonial Approaches 15PANH086 15 Term 1
729 Anthropology of Sustainability: Global Challenges and Alternative Futures 15PANH083 15 Term 1
Anthropology of Development and Sustainability: Knowledge, Power and Inequality 15PANH084 15 Term 1
723 Diet, Society and Environment 15PANH090 15 Term 2
722 Food, Place and Mobility 15PANH087 15 Term 1
752 Anthropology of 'Race', Gender and Sexuality 15PANH082 15 Term 2
750A Ethnographic Locations: Sub-Saharan Africa 15PANH063 15 Term 2
750C Ethnographic Locations: Near and Middle East 15PANH067 15
797A Directed Practical Study in the Anthropology of Food 15PANH045 15 Full Year
730 Anthropology and Climate Change 15PANH070 15 Term 2
753 Mind, Culture and Psychiatry 15PANH032 15 Term 1
755 Anthropological Approaches to the Body and Embodiment 15PANH088 15
754 Medical Anthropology: Global Perspectives 15PANH089 15 Term 1

 

Programme Specification

Important notice

The information on the programme page reflects the intended programme structure against the given academic session. If you are a current student you can find structure information on the previous year link at the top of the page or through your Department. Please read the important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules.

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge. The SOAS Anthropology Department sponsors several lecture series, including the weekly Departmental Research Seminar, the Food Studies Centre's Food Forum and the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies’ Seminar Series.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Modules

During the academic year, modules are delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials and/or seminars. Students can expect an average of two hours of classroom time per week for each module. Outside of the classroom, students explore topics of the module through independent study and through personal exchanges with teachers and fellow students. In some cases, modules are taught by several teachers within the department to provide students with an array of perpsectives on the subject. All modules involve the active participation of students in the discussion of ideas, viewpoints and readings.

The Dissertation

The MRes Social Anthropology culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation, based on original research on a topic of the student's own choosing and developed in discussion with a supervisor.

Employment

Students of the MRes Social Anthropology develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills. 

Many MRes students go on to do successful PhD research, either within our department or at other leading universities. Others apply their knowledge of research methods in employment in international institutions, NGOs, government, and business, both within the UK and overseas. Recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration.

For more information visit Graduate Destinations for this department.

A Student's Perspective

My time studying Social Anthropology at SOAS was characterised by expert teachers sharing an overwhelming amount of fascinating ideas, perspectives and experiences for us to learn from

Tamsin Koumis

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