SOAS University of London

Centre of African Studies

Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED
Worldmaking after Empire
Adom Getachew

Date: 17 March 2021Time: 5:00 PM

Finishes: 17 March 2021Time: 7:00 PM

Venue: Virtual Event

Type of Event: Virtual Event

Decolonization revolutionized the international order during the twentieth century. Yet standard histories that present the end of colonialism as an inevitable transition from a world of empires to one of nations—a world in which self-determination was synonymous with nation-building—obscure just how radical this change was. Drawing on the political thought of anticolonial intellectuals and statesmen such as Nnamdi Azikiwe, W.E.B Du Bois, George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah, Eric Williams, Michael Manley, and Julius Nyerere, this important new account of decolonization reveals the full extent of their unprecedented ambition to remake not only nations but the world.

Adom Getachew shows that African, African American, and Caribbean anticolonial nationalists were not solely or even primarily nation-builders. Responding to the experience of racialized sovereign inequality, dramatized by interwar Ethiopia and Liberia, Black Atlantic thinkers and politicians challenged international racial hierarchy and articulated alternative visions of worldmaking. Seeking to create an egalitarian postimperial world, they attempted to transcend legal, political, and economic hierarchies by securing a right to self-determination within the newly founded United Nations, constituting regional federations in Africa and the Caribbean, and creating the New International Economic Order.

About the Author

Adom Getachew is Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science. Adom holds a joint PhD in Political Science and African-American Studies from Yale University. She is on the faculty board of the Pozen Center for Human Rights, a fellow at the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory, and a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago. She is a political theorist with research interests in the history of political thought, theories of race and empire, and postcolonial political theory. Her work focuses on the intellectual and political histories of Africa and the Caribbean. 

In conversation with: Brian Kagoro, Pan Africanist and Programme Support Division Director, OSF, Africa Regional Office

Chair: Dr Awino Okech, Reader at the Centre of Gender Studies

Registration

This event is open to the public, however registration is required. Online Registration

Organiser: SOAS Centre of African Studies

Contact email: cas@soas.ac.uk