SOAS University of London

Centre of African Studies

Slavery Routes Part 3: 1620 – 1789: From sugar to rebellion

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED

Date: 24 October 2018Time: 7:00 PM

Finishes: 24 October 2018Time: 9:00 PM

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: Khalili Lecture Theatre

Type of Event: Film Screening

Dir. by Daniel Cattier, Juan Gélas, Fanny Glissant

Producers: Compagnie des Phares et Balises, ARTE France, Kwassa Films, RTBF, LX Filmes, RTP, Inrap

This is the story of a world whose territories and own frontiers were built by the slave trade. A world where violence, subjugation and profit imposed their routes. The history of slavery did not begin in the cotton fields. It is a much older tragedy, that has been going on since the dawn of humanity. From the VIIth century on, and for over 1,200 years, Africa was the epicenter of a gigantic traffic of human beings traversing the entire globe. Nubian, Fulani, Mandinka, Songhai, Susu, Akan, Yoruba, Igbo, Kongo, Yao, Somali… Over 20 million Africans were deported, sold and enslaved. This criminal system thrived, laying the foundations of empires around the world. Its scale was such that for a long time, it has been impossible to relate it comprehensively. And yet, it raises a fundamental question: how did Africa end up at the heart of the slavery routes?

Series convened by Dr Marie Rodet (SOAS Department of History, School of History, Religions & Philosophies) and Dr Shihan de Silva (Institute of Commonwealth Studies)

www.slaveryroutes.com

Part 3

1620 – 1789: From sugar to rebellion

Q&A with Prof Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch (University Paris - Diderot)

XVIIth century. The Atlantic has become the battlefield of the sugar war. French, English, Dutch and Spaniards fought for the Caribbean to cultivate sugar cane. To satisfy their dreams of fortune, the European Kingdoms opened new slavery routes between Africa and the islands of the New World. With the complicity of banks and insurance companies, they industrialized their methods and brought the number of deportations to unprecedented levels. Trapped, nearly 7 million African were caught up in a gigantic hurricane of violence.

Registration

To register please email: cas@soas.ac.uk

Organisers: SOAS School of History, Philosophies and Religions, SOAS Centre of African Studies and Institute of Commonwealth Studies

Contact email: cas@soas.ac.uk