SOAS University of London

Department of Linguistics

Translation Theory

Module Code:
15PLIH047
Credits:
15
Taught in:
Term 1

Objectives and learning outcomes of the module

At the end of the module, a student should be able to demonstrate:

  1. a good knowledge of key concepts, issues and theories of translation
  2. a good ability of effective application of translation principles and strategies
  3. knowledge of translation profession

Workload

A total of 10 weeks with 2 hours of classroom contact per week.

Scope and syllabus

This is a core module of the MA in Translation. It covers the theoretical aspect of the programme by teaching the major concepts, issues and theories of translation. The module will also assist students making the connection between translation theories and practice to ensure effective use of the theories learned in the module

Method of assessment

One essay of 3,000 words (100%); this will either reflect on and critique a translation theory, or analyse translation phenomena or new data in reference to translation theory that is covered in the module.  

Suggested reading

  1. Baker, M. (1992). In other words – A coursebook on translation. London: Routledge.
  2. Baker, M. (ed.) (1998). The Routledge Encyclopaedia of Translation Studies. London: Routledge.
  3. Bassnett, S. (2002). Translation Studies. London: Routledge.
  4. Hatim, Basil & Ian Mason. (1997). The translator as communicator. London ; New York : Routledge.
  5. Newmark, P. (1986). Approaches to translation. Pergamon Press.
  6. Newmark, P. (1998). More paragraphs on translation. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
  7. Newmark, P. (2005). A textbook of translation. London: Longman.
  8. Nida, E. A. (1969). Science of translation. Language, 45(3), 483-498.
  9. Nida, E.A. (1993). Language, culture, and translating. Shanghai: Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press.
  10. Nida, E. A. (2003). The theory and practice of translation. Brill: Brill Academic Publishers.
  11. Nord, C. (1997). Translating as a Purposeful Activity: Functionalist Approaches Explained. Manchester: St. Jerome.
  12. Snell-Hornby, M., F. Pöchhacker & K. Kaindl (eds) (1994). Translation Studies: An Integrated Approach . Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Disclaimer

Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules