SOAS University of London

Centre for Translation Studies

UKRI/AHRC granted research project: Covid-19 risks among London’s minority and ethnic communities

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED

Date: 17 February 2021Time: 5:00 PM

Finishes: 17 February 2021Time: 7:00 PM

Venue: Virtual Event

Type of Event: Virtual Webinar

Please register here.

Speakers

Nana Sato-Rossberg (LCL)

Lutz Marten (LCL)

Edward Simpson (Ant)

Yan Jiang (LCL)

Researchers (SOAS)

Abstract

SOAS University of London languages and cultures scholars have been awarded UKRI/AHRC funding for a research project examining Covid-19 public health information among linguistically diverse communities in London.

Led by Dr Nana Sato-Rossberg (Principal Investigator) Head of School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, and the three Co-investigators Dr Yan Jiang, Professor Lutz Marten, and Professor Edward Simpson, the project will involve a team of 14 SOAS languages and cultures experts and anthropologists, who will investigate how information about Covid-19 and associated risks flows is translated in 14 different languages spoken in London.

London is a highly multilingual community – there are more than 200 languages spoken in London’s primary schools alone. Many of London’s multilingual and multicultural communities have access to, and rely on, information about Covid-19 in several languages. As a result, London’s migrant, ethnic, and minority communities are engaged in translating and interpreting Covid-19 information from different sources and often adopt a variety of perspectives, which will inform their understanding of and behavioural response to the pandemic. 

The communities involved in this project speak languages as diverse as Standard Arabic, Algerian Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Punjabi, Turkish, Urdu, Somali, Swahili, and Yoruba. The project will collect, document, and synthesize individual accounts from community members in London, information in the target languages published in London, and information available to community members from their (historical) home countries, their governments and on social media. The project will draw on the extensive language and cultural expertise at SOAS in collaboration with public agencies and community representatives.