SOAS University of London

Department of Development Studies

Development Studies seminar series

The Development Studies Seminars take place weekly during terms 1 & 2 with speakers representing the full range of development-related disciplines including economics, political science, anthropology, sociology and history.

Entrance is free and seminars are open to the public.

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Forthcoming Events

Cities in Contexts of Power and Counterpower: A Global Perspective

Professor Emeritus Göran Therborn (University of Cambridge)

Missing in the currently predominant literature on cities  is a perspective of cities in contexts of power and politics, of cities as part of systems of power.

23 January 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

World Market, Patterns of Accumulation, and State Forms: The Political Economy of the Latin American Left

Dr Jeff Webber (Queen Mary, University of London)

This paper provides a synoptic assessment of the political economy of the Left turn in Latin America in the twenty-first century. First, it charts the broad trajectory of Latin America’s political economy in relation to trends in the world market and the international division of labour between 1980 and 2017.

30 January 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Crisis of Social Reproduction and the End of Work

Dr Nick Srnicek (King's College London)

There has been much discussion in recent years about the “crisis of work”, with academics and journalists alike pointing to potentially concerning trends in the labour market.

6 February 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Struggle for Development

Professor Mark Duffield (University of Bristol), Dr Laura Hammond (SOAS, University of London), Professor Benjamin Selwyn (University of Sussex)

Most development thought is based upon the assumption that the uplifting of the world’s poor is to be carried out by elite actors (states, corporations, NGOs) rather than the poor themselves.

20 February 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Wild East: India’s Criminal Economy and Politics

Professor Barbara Harriss-White (University of Oxford)

In the 21st century, many parts of the South Asian subcontinent are being conquered not by settler-migrants (as was the case in the Wild West) but by unruly and illegal forms of capital.

27 February 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Black Revolution: The Global Politics of Black Radicalism

Dr Kehinde Andrews (Birmingham City)

Black radicalism is one of the most misunderstood political philosophies that exist. Conflated with extremism; narrow versions of nationalism and; misogynistic organisations, it has largely been dismissed or overlooked as the ‘evil twin on the Civil Rights Movement’.

6 March 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

South-South Development Cooperation 3.0? Changes in the Decade Ahead

Dr Emma Mawdsley (University of Cambridge)

The last decade or so has been a period of remarkable success for the actors, ideas and practices of South-South Cooperation. First, the number of Southern development partners has grown, and collectively they have significantly increased their development finances and programmes. Second, they have consolidated and defended the claim to doing development differently. Third, they have achieved recognition as essential partners within the international development community.

13 March 2018, Russell Square: College Buildings, DLT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM