SOAS University of London

Department of Development Studies

Development Studies seminar series

The Development Studies Seminars take place weekly during terms 1 & 2 with speakers representing the full range of development-related disciplines including economics, political science, anthropology, sociology and history.

Entrance is free and seminars are open to the public.

Previous Events in this series

Development in Crisis: States, Conflicts, Refugees. Celebrating 25 Years of Development Studies at SOAS

Professor Gilbert Achcar, Professor Chris Cramer, Dr Laura Hammond, Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Professor James Putzel, Chaired by Dr Zoë Marriage

Since Development Studies was first taught at SOAS 25 years ago, the SOAS Department of Development Studies has provided critical perspectives on a wide range of issues that have gone on to shape development theory and practice.

14 March 2017, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Alumni Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Capitalism and the Sea: Sovereignty, Territory and Accumulation in the Global Ocean

Dr Liam Campling, Alejandro Colás

We introduce the term ‘terraqueous territoriality’ to analyse a particular relationship between capitalism as a social formation, and the sea as a natural force. Focusing on three spaces – exclusive economic zones (EEZs), the system of ‘flags of convenience’, and multilateral counter-piracy initiatives.

7 March 2017, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Alumni Lecture Theatre , 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Russian Revolution and Global Development: Lessons from the First Hundred Years

Tariq Ali, Professor August H. Nimtz, Professor Tamás Krausz

The Russian Revolution was the greatest anti-capitalist uprising in history, and from its origins, sparked controversy, chaos, imagination and hope. It began with the dismantling of the Tsarist autocracy in February 1917 and its replacement with a provisional government; by October, the provisional government was also overthrown.

28 February 2017, Brunei Gallery, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Economic Inequality and Gender Inequality

Professor Diane Elson

Economic inequality is now of major concern to both mainstream and heterodox economists.  Gender inequality has always been of major concern to feminist economists, but is often ignored by both mainstream and heterodox economists. This talk will explore the intersections between these two aspects of inequality and discuss what difference it makes if gender is brought  into analysis of economic inequality.

21 February 2017, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Alumni Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Violent Past, Hot Present, Extreme Future: Episodes of Fossil Imperialism and Climate Change in Egypt, India and Nigeria

Andreas Malm

Global warming is lapping the shores of countries in the global South with a whole fleet of existential threats. But this is not the first time fossil fuel combustion has visited them. This talk will focus on three places where the British Empire used steamboats to subjugate distant populations and appropriate their resources: Egypt, India and Nigeria, all targets of nineteenth-century imperial expansion powered by coal.

31 January 2017, Brunei Gallery, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Retail Shift: Transforming Work and Gender in Global Production

Professor Stephanie Barrientos

The expansion of global retail has significant implications for analysis of work and gender. Within the retail sector supermarkets, agrifood and manufacturing brands play a central role transforming production, processing, distribution and consumption across developed and developing countries.

24 January 2017, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Alumni Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Demolishing Neoliberal Development Myths

Professor Jayati Ghosh, Professor Erik S. Reinert, Professor Rainer Kattel,

The editors of the Handbook of Alternative Theories of Economic Development attempt to cover a huge canvas, in both time and geography, in order to illustrate processes of economic development from many different angles, with authors of the different chapters hailing from all continents.

17 January 2017, Paul Webley Wing (Senate House), Alumni Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Agrarian Questions Then And Now

Professor Barbara Harriss-White, Professor Terry Byres, Professor Henry Bernstein, Professor Jan Douwe van der Ploeg, Chaired by Dr Jens Lerche

The field of critical agrarian studies has undergone an exciting re-invigoration over the last four decades, addressing new and emerging questions arising from the onset of globalisation and its impacts on agriculture.

6 December 2016, Senate House, (S)ALT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Russian Crisis and Global Geopolitics: Dilemmas of Authoritarian Rule

Professor Anastasia Nesvetailova

Since 2000, Russia’s model of political economy has evolved around three main channels of global economic integration: 1) export of natural resources and a national system of redistribution of export revenues; 2) financialisation, which acts as a boost for domestic consumption/demand; and 3) offshore integration of Russian capital into global capital markets.

22 November 2016, Senate House, (S)ALT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Anti-Value in Marx

Professor David Harvey

At the end of the very first section of Capital, after offering an initial definition of the labor theory of value, Marx observes that "nothing can be of value without being an object of utility.

17 November 2016, Brunei Gallery, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Struggle for Development

Dr Benjamin Selwyn

Mainstream development thinking – whether (neo) liberal, statist and some Marxist variants – is founded upon a fundamental paradox. It advocates the oppression and exploitation of the poor in the name of helping the poor.

1 November 2016, Senate House, (S)ALT, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises

Anwar Shaikh

Competition and conflict are intrinsic features of modern societies. Inequality is persistent, and booms andbusts are recurrent outcomes throughout capitalist history. State intervention modifies these patterns butdoes not abolish them.

11 October 2016, Brunei Gallery, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Global Capitalism, Global War, Global Crisis

Professor Adam Morton (Department of Political Economy, University of Sydney, Australia) and Professor Andreas Bieler (School of Politics and International Relations, Nottingham University, UK)
8 March 2016, Russell Square: College Buildings, G3, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

The Development of Underdevelopment in the UK

Professor Colin Leys (Department of Political Studies, Queen’s University, Canada and Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)
1 March 2016, Russell Square: College Buildings, G3, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Transformative Politics and the Solidarity Economy

Professor Michelle Williams and Dr Vishwas Satgar (School of Social Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa)
2 February 2016, Russell Square: College Buildings, G3, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Rules for the World Market

Professor Paul Cammack (Department of Asian and International Studies, City University of Hong Kong, China)
27 October 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, G3, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Rural Cooperatives and Fair Trade

Prof Chris Cramer (SOAS)

All welcome, no booking required.

17 February 2015, Russell Square: College Buildings, G3, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Title TBC

TBC
18 March 2014, Russell Square: College Buildings, G50, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Revolutions and Development

Vicken Chetarian (Development Studies, SOAS)
29 October 2013, Russell Square: College Buildings, G50, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Recovering Internationalism: Creating The New Global Solidarity

Peter Waterman (Network Institute for Global Democracy (Helsinki); Programa De Estudios Sobre Democracia y Transformacion Global (Lima) & Critical Action: Centre in Movement (New Delhi))
4 December 2012, Russell Square: College Buildings, G50, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Struggles in Bolivia

Jeffrey Webber (Queen Mary, UoL)
1 November 2011, Russell Square: College Buildings, G50, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Just Give Money to the Poor

Joseph Hanlon (Open University)
1 February 2011, Russell Square: College Buildings, G50, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM