SOAS University of London

School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

Redundancy in Multiple Exponence

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED
Speaker: Matthew J. Carroll (Surrey Morphology Group)

Date: 27 February 2019Time: 3:30 PM

Finishes: 27 February 2019Time: 5:00 PM

Venue: Faber Building, 23/24 Russell Square Room: FG01

Type of Event: Seminar

Multiple exponence is typically defined as the redundant multiple marking of categories within a single word. Based on a discussion of cross-linguistic variation, I show that the empirical situation is more complex with cases of multiple exponence displaying gradient levels of redundancy. To capture this, I propose a typology of redundancy in multiple exponence based on two distinct parameters of redundancy, contributional redundancy and specificational redundancy, each of which divide into logical parallel types. I demonstrate that logic of these types correspond to the logic of set relations from set theory. This informs a novel model-theoretic approach to describing the typological space embedded in the formal calculus of set theory. I demonstrate how such an approach allows for explicit definitions of the typological space along with formulas for quantifiable measurement of redundancy along the two parameters established in the typology. This paper enlarges the previous discussion of multiple exponence to include previously excluded phenomena and provides an explicit principled means of describing and measuring a range complex phenomena in natural logical terms.

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Redundancy in Multiple Exponence

About the speaker:

Matthew J Carroll is a Newton International Fellow hosted at the Surrey Morphology Group. His current project examines distributed exponence and inflectional redundancy from both formal and typological perspectives. Prior to this fellowship, he completed his PhD at the Australian National University, where he worked on the previously undescribed language Ngkolmpu, a Papuan language of the Yam family spoken in West Papua and notable for its morphological complexity.

 

Contact email: rv4@soas.ac.uk