SOAS University of London

Using Drama in Language Learning

THIS EVENT IS ARCHIVED

Date: 13 November 2009Time: 9:00 AM

Finishes: 13 November 2009Time: 6:00 PM

Venue: Vernon Square

Type of Event: Workshop

Details

Some research suggests that the use of drama in the teaching and learning of languages can provide interesting ways of motivating language learners and teachers. The Languages of the Wider World CETL invites you to a day of seminars and workshops to explore these ideas further. The day will bring together practitioners, researchers and students from a variety of fields to share and discuss their experiences and techniques in the use of drama for language teaching and learning.

Keynote Speakers

Nick Bilbrough (Horizon Language Training, UK)
The (Second Language) Play’s The Thing read abstract

Mario Rinvolucri (Pilgrims, Canterbury, UK)
Storytelling: The Oldest Language Teaching Technique read abstract

Ken Wilson (ELT author and former director of the English Teaching Theatre)
Is Improvisation good for students? read abstract

Marjo Piironen (North Karelia University of Applied Sciences, Finland)
Process Drama as a Tool for Language Education read abstract

Dr Meili Fang (International Exchange and Education Centre, Ochanomizu University, Japan)
Performing Across Cultures: Drama in the Classroom read abstract

Workshops

Performance Skills for Affective Teaching
Mark Almond (Christ Church University, Canterbury, UK) read abstract

Linking Gestures and Movements with Spoken Language read abstract
Rawad Abou Hamad (The Arabic Club for Kids, London)

Image Theatre: Sculpting our Worlds
Richard Chinn (Brasshouse Language Centre, UK) read abstract

Storytelling in Language Teaching read abstract
Sally Pomme Clayton (professional storyteller and author, UK)

Performances

Story Telling Performance - Sally Pomme Clayton
Theatre Performance - True Heart Theatre & London Playback Theatre

Useful Documents

Programme

Abstracts

The (Second Language) Play’s The Thing

Nick Bilbrough (Horizon Language Training, UK)

Scripted plays have been used to teach second languages since the Middle Ages. In this interactive talk, I’ll reflect on my experiences as both a language learner and teacher, and propose a rationale for the practice and performance of scripted dialogues and sketches as a core component within a very modern lexical (Lewis 1993) or ‘play’ based (Cook 2000) syllabus.

Storytelling: The Oldest Language Teaching Technique

Mario Rinvolucri (Pilgrims, Canterbury, UK) 

When we tell stories in class we are inviting students back into their childhood and suggesting a very positive type of regression that really does open up the linguistic unconscious. In this session we will explore several story-telling techniques and through this examine the processes happening in your head as you listen to stories.

Is improvisation good for your students?

Ken Wilson (ELT author and former director of the English Teaching Theatre)

Anyone familiar with improvised theatre and comedy may think that 'improvisation' is inappropriate for their students. How can students who often struggle to put together the simplest sentences in class be expected to improvise? Good question! And one that I hope to answer with a series of guided and controlled improvisations that can work with students at all levels.

Performing Across Cultures: Drama in the Classroom

Dr Meili Fang (International Exchange and Education Centre, Ochanomizu University, Japan)

This paper describes the use of drama to increase learners’ language outcomes. I will describe the process of creating drama pieces in the classroom, and how the process helps learners develop a variety of language and cultural skills. I see drama as one part of a ‘Performance Approach’, in which learners collaborate intensively in the multicultural classroom, and learn how to perform in the culture of the target language. Video also plays a role in developing and documenting these performances, and the talk will include video presentations of all phases of the process and the learners’

Performance Skills for Affective Teaching

Mark Almond (Christ Church University, Canterbury, UK)

This practical 'how to' session will look at techniques teachers can borrow from the craft of acting. Theatre actors have to make every performance as fresh, enthusiastic and energetic as the first time they play a particular character; actors maximise the use of space and movement on stage to establish relationships with other characters and to control audience attention; actors have to use their voices and bodies creatively to convey meaning and maintain audience attention and they use both pathos and humour to provoke a human reaction. These skills are equally important for us if we want to be as effective as possible as teachers and if we want to reduce anxiety and tension in the classroom, make our lessons enjoyable and memorable, develop productive rapports with learners and enhance classroom dynamics. You will leave this workshop with fresh ideas for making more creative use of space, movement, body, voice and humour in your own teaching.

Linking Gestures and Movement with Spoken Language

Rawad Abou Hamad (The Arabic Club for Kids, London)

Learning a language is not a passive process. We don’t want to just sit and listen to our teacher any more! We can play, move, act and learn at the same time. If you want to explore a range of different physical activities such as mime, still images, and building scenes based on props, pictures and phrases, then come along to this very practical workshop.

Image Theatre: Sculpting our Worlds

Richard Chinn (Brasshouse Language Centre, UK)

This workshop will demonstrate activities inspired by the theatrical work of Augusto Boal which will enliven your class by drawing on the participants’ views of the world. It will include activities which will promote discussion and are adaptable for various levels. These activities have recently been tried and tested on language learners with some very positive and interesting results. You will leave this workshop with ideas you can adapt for your own classes. The workshop will be led by trained actor, EFL/ESOL teacher and teacher trainer Richard Chinn, who has run drama classes for adult language learners over the past 5 years and more recently workshops on drama for language teachers. Richard’s special interests are in group dynamics, communication in the classroom, teacher development and the integration of drama techniques into language teaching.

Process Drama as a Tool for Language Education

Marjo Piironen (North Karelia University of Applied Sciences, Finland)

Language learning today is focused increasingly on language education. In addition to building up a student’s linguistic competence, language education has other goals, such as developing a learner’s interaction and interpersonal skills. According to the guidelines of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) the aims of language teaching are plurilingualism and pluriculturalism. Reaching these goals calls for more emphasis on communicative and experiential language learning methods. The aim of this presentation is to discuss process drama as a tool for language education. Process drama is a method in which the learners and the teacher explore a theme, a problem or a situation by using various drama techniques. Process drama offers numerous opportunities for authentic communication as well as more structured language practice.

Storytelling in Language Teaching

Sally Pomme Clayton (professional storyteller and author, UK)

Using storytelling to encourage and develop speaking and listening. Professional storyteller and writer, Sally Pomme Clayton, leads a practical workshop introducing the process of how to tell a story. We will explore story structure, memory and visualization. You can use this processes tell your own stories in the classroom, or explore it with your students. Sally Pomme will tell you a story, and also talk a bit about her work using storytelling with refugee groups and how telling stories has helped build language bridges.

Videos
Loading the player...

Using Drama in Language Learning

Organiser: Languages of the Wider World CETL (SOAS-UCL)