SOAS University of London

Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Near and Middle East

MA Iranian Studies (2021 entry)

Select year of entry: 2022 2021

  • Q&A
  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Employment

Overview

Overview and entry requirements

The MA in Iranian Studies enables students to critically assess the historical development of Iranian society, economics and culture within the context of the wider west Asian area and to appreciate the complexity of the history and cultural make up of Iran. 

The Iranian Studies MA's flexible programme and interdisciplinary curriculum will enrich students knowledge about the religious and politico-cultural influences affecting contemporary Iran and the region it is embedded in. Students will develop a critical understanding of the literature and/or of Iran and the diaspora and gain an understanding of Iran in the context of the Middle East with respect to gender, politics, Islam, music, and migration (minor module options). Persian language and literature will also be studied.

See Near and Middle East Department

Why study Iran at SOAS

  • SOAS is ranked 1st in London in the Complete University Guide 2021 for Middle Eastern and African Studies, and 6th in UK
  • we are world-renowned for our language courses and specialist in the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East
  • Among all universities in Europe and North America, SOAS hosts the biggest concentration of research and teaching staff working on Iranian history, politics, economics, religions, art and archeology, linguistics, Persian language and literature, media, film, anthropology and music.
  • SOAS has the resources to offer a comprehensive, critical perspective on a variety of aspects of Iranian society and culture and go beyond the contemporary public debates around this country.

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings

Start of programme: September intake only

Mode of Attendance: Full-time or Part-time

Entry requirements

  • We will consider all applications with 2:ii (or international equivalent) or higher. In addition to degree classification we take into account other elements of the application including supporting statement and references.

Featured events

Convenors

Q&A

Introducing MA Iranian Studies

Arshin Adib-Moghaddam

With a growing demand for experts in Iranian affairs, Professor Arshin Adib-Moghaddam provides an overview of the MA Iranian Studies programme.

What does the course involve?

The course is unique in its approach. It provides an in-depth analysis of contemporary Iranian affairs from an inter-disciplinary perspective that exposes students to the full depth of expertise in Iranian Studies at SOAS. In addition, the course introduces students to the region that Iran is embedded in. The core course is team taught, which gives students the unique opportunity to work with several world-leading scholars.

Who will the course appeal to?

The course will appeal to a wide range of students interested in contemporary Iranian politics, international affairs, economics, culture and history. There is no language requirement to enter the course and the wide-ranging courses on offer ensure that students will not be "limited" to Iranian Studies.  

What facilities are available?

The course is embedded in a generous inter-departmental structure that gives students the opportunity to choose from a variety of courses in the Department of the Languages and Cultures of the Near and Middle East and the Department of Politics and International Studies. While Persian is not a prerequisite to study on this course, SOAS is world-renowned for its language courses. When we first conceived of the MA and wrote the core course, we made sure it was flanked by the Centre for Iranian Studies, which I have been chairing since 2013. The Centre also administers the generous Kamran Djam scholarships, which have supported some of our students in the past.

What is special about the programme at SOAS?

There is no university in the world that can boast such a concentration of scholarship about Iran. At SOAS, colleagues specialise in Iran's economy, religions, culture, poetry, literature, politics, languages and international relations. There is then, the unique opportunity to understand the mosaic complexity of this country from several perspectives. This is one of the reasons why the SOAS MA in Iranian Studies has grown into one of the biggest in the world in a very short period of time.

Can you recommend a good book to read on MA Iranian Studies?

Ervand Abrahamian's "A History of Modern Iran" is a good start. The new book series "The Global Middle East" by Cambridge University Press has been publishing several useful books about Iran and the region as well.

What do students do after graduating?

There is growing demand for experts in Iranian affairs, and West Asia and North Africa more generally. Our students have moved into careers in consultancy, academia, think-tanks, global business, and international diplomacy. 

Structure

Learn a language as part of this programme

Degree programmes at SOAS - including this one - can include language courses in more than forty African and Asian languages. It is SOAS students’ command of an African or Asian language which sets SOAS apart from other universities.

Structure

Students take 180 credits, 60 credits from the dissertation and 120 credits from taught modules. As part of the taught modules, students must take:

  • the core module 'Iran: Culture, History, Politics' (30 credits)
  • 30 credits from List A
  • and a further 60 credits from List A or List B

Programme

Module Code Credits Term
Dissertation in Iranian Studies 15PNMC998 60 Full Year
Core Modules
Module Code Credits Term
Iran: History, Culture, Politics 15PNMC405 30 Full Year
The Middle East in Ten Issues 15PNMH054 15 Term 2
Guided option

Select 30 credits from List A plus another 45 credits from List A or B

List A
Module Code Credits Term
Persian 1 A (PG) 15PNMH016 15 Term 1
Persian 1 B (PG) 15PNMH017 15 Term 2
Persian 2 A (PG) 15PNMH026 15 Term 1
Persian 2 B (PG) 15PNMH027 15 Term 2
Persian 3 (PG) 15PNMC408 30 Full Year
Classical Persian Poetry: Texts and Traditions (PG) 15PNMC401 15 Full Year
Classical Persian Poetry: Texts and Traditions (PG) 15PNMC401 15 Full Year
Practical Translation: English into Other Languages 15PLIH071 15 Term 1
Practical Translation: Other Languages into English 15PLIH072 15 Term 2
Zoroastrianism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 15PSRC052 30 Full Year
List B
Anthropology
Module Code Credits Term
Art & Archaelogy
Module Code Credits Term
Arab Painting 15PARH054 15 Term 1
Islam and the West: Artistic and Cultural Contacts 15PARH034 15 Term 2
Development Studies
Module Code Credits Term
Problems of Development in the Middle East and North Africa 15PDSH019 15 Term 2
Water and Development: Commodification, Ecology and Globalisation (Development Studies) 15PDSH049 15 Term 2
Water Justice: Rights, Access and Movements (Development Studies) 15PDSH041 15 Term 1
Economics
Module Code Credits Term
Political Economy of Development and Change in the Middle East 15PECC028 15 Term 1
Gender Studies
Module Code Credits Term
Gender in the Middle East 15PGNH001 15 Term 1
Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East 15PGNH007 15 Term 2
Queering Migrations and Diasporas 15PGNH002 15 Term 2
History
Module Code Credits Term
Colonial curricula: empire and education at SOAS and beyond 15PHIH054 15 Term 1
Empire and Reform in the Modern Middle East, 1789-1914 15PHIH031 15 Term 1
Empire, Law, and Citizenship in the Middle East and the Balkans 15PHIH049 15 Term 2
Nationalism and Revolution in the Modern Middle East, 1914-1979 15PHIH032 15 Term 2
The Afghanistan Wars, 1979 to the Present 15PHIH056 15 Term 1
School of Law
Module Code Credits Term
Human Rights and Islamic Law 15PLAC150 30 Full Year
Law and Society in The Middle East and North Africa 15PLAC130 30 Full Year
Media Studies
Module Code Credits Term
Mediated Culture in the Middle East: Politics and Communications 15PMSH003 15 Term 2
Languages, Cultures & Linguistics
Module Code Credits Term
Comparative Literature: A New Era 15PCSH005 15 Term 2
Comparative Literature: Methodology and Critique 15PCSH004 15 Full Year
Cinemas of of the Middle East and North Africa 1 15PNMH048 15 Term 1
Cinemas of of the Middle East and North Africa 2 15PNMH049 15 Term 2
Modern Trends in Islam 15PNMC228 30 Full Year
Introduction to the Study of Language 15PLIC008 30 Full Year
Arabic 1 A (PG) 15PNMH029 15 Term 1
Arabic 1 B (PG) 15PNMH028 15 Term 2
Arabic 2 A (PG) 15PNMH045 15 Full Year
Arabic 2 B (PG) 15PNMH044 15 Full Year
Hebrew 1 A (PG) 15PNMH018 15 Term 1
Hebrew 1 B (PG) 15PNMH019 15 Term 2
Hebrew 2 A (UG) 155906734 15 Term 1
Hebrew 2 B (UG) 155906733 15 Term 2
Ottoman Turkish Language (PG) 15PNMC397 30 Full Year
Turkish 1 A (PG) 15PNMH014 15 Term 1
Turkish 1B (PG) 15PNMH015 15 Term 2
Turkish 2 A (PG) 15PNMH047 15 Term 1
Turkish 2 B (PG) 15PNMH046 15 Term 2
Politics
Module Code Credits Term
Geopolitics and Security in Central Asia and the Caucasus 15PPOH023 15 Term 2
International politics of the Middle East 15PPOH047 15 Term 1
Islam and politics 15PPOH006 15 Term 2
Political society in the Middle East 15PPOH008 15 Term 2
State and transformation in the Middle East 15PPOH011 15 Term 1
Artificial Intelligence and Human Security 15PPOH048 15 Term 1

 

Important notice

The information on the programme page reflects the intended programme structure against the given academic session. If you are a current student you can find structure information on the previous year link at the top of the page or through your Department. Please read the important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules.

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning

One-year Masters programmes consist of 180 credits. 120 credits are taught in modules of 30 credits (taught over 20 weeks) or 15 credits (taught over 10 weeks); the dissertation makes up the remaining 60 units. The programme structure shows which modules are compulsory and which optional.

Contact hours

As a rough guide, 1 credit equals approximately 10 hours of work. Most of this will be independent study, including reading and research, preparing coursework and revising for examinations. It will also include class time, which may include lectures, seminars and other classes. Some subjects, such as learning a language, have more class time than others. At SOAS, most postgraduate modules have a one hour lecture and a one hour seminar every week, but this does vary. 

More information is on the page for each module.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge
  • Acquire specific factual knowledge about modern Iranian history and politics, religion and society, arts, literature, media, economics.
  • Appreciate the diversity and complexity of contemporary Iranian society and culture.
  • In the intensive language pathway, students will furthermore be able to study a language to a certain level of proficiency, thus immersing them in the language of the region.
Intellectual (thinking) skills
  • Critically assess the historical development of Iranian society, economics and culture within the context of the wider west Asian area.
  • Analyse Iran in accordance with an interdisciplinary curriculum and a flexible study programme encompassing the full range of historical, cultural and socio-economic aspects of the country in past and present.
  • Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically from a variety of sources and how to resolve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.
  • Students will learn the strengths and disciplines of particular disciplinary and theoretical approaches, cultivating their ability to draw on a variety of such approaches.
  • Students will learn how to design and manage an independent research project, formulating the problem to be addressed, identifying the data to be analysed, and synthesizing the findings to present well-supported conclusions.
Subject-based practical skills
  • Learn to use Iran-related reference materials and research tools, the most recent research in various areas of Iranian studies presented in the core module and in the optional units.
  • Students will learn how to read critically, to participate effectively in seminar discussions, and to present their work in both oral and written form.
  • More specific skills will depend on the particular modules taken.
Transferrable skills
  • The ability to organise research, formulate arguments, gather and evaluate data, formulate conclusions and present these in a coherent and clear manner.
  • Students will learn how to access and evaluate electronic and other data effectively and efficiently.
  • Students will learn how to solve complex problems, for example concerning economic development, historical causation, literary interpretation, or political decision-making.
  • Students will learn how to communicate effectively in a variety of settings and formats.

SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

Employment

Graduates of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with skills in written and oral communication, analysis and problem solving.

Recent School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics graduates have been hired by:

  • Africa Matters
  • Amnesty International
  • Arab British Chamber of Commerce
  • BBC World Service
  • British High Commission
  • Council for British Research in the Levant
  • Department for International Development
  • Edelman
  • Embassy of Jordan
  • Ernst & Young
  • Foreign & Commonwealth Office
  • Google
  • Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies
  • Middle East Eye
  • Saïd Foundation
  • TalkAbout Speech Therapy
  • The Black Curriculum
  • The Telegraph
  • United Nations Development Programme
  • UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency
  • Wall Street Journal

Find out about our Careers Service.

A Student's Perspective

Before I came to SOAS, I knew that my grade would depend on either one or two large assignments and I was apprehensive about that—almost scared, however I am glad as I got to learn a lot about myself as a student. I became more independent academically and got to see what I can really accomplished without teachers “coddling” me along the way. Extremely refreshing!

Tamara Bah, American University, Washington

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