SOAS University of London

Department of the Languages and Cultures of South East Asia

BA Indonesian and . . .

duration:
3 / 4 years

2017 Entry requirements

  • Subjects Preferred: No
  • Interview Policy: Candidates with non-standard qualifications may be invited for interview, though many applications are assessed on the basis of the UCAS forms alone.

Featured events

  • Overview
  • Combinations
  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Fees and funding
  • Employment
  • Apply

Overview

Programme Code: T341BA/Ind

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings

Start of programme: September

Mode of Attendance: Full-time

SOAS is the only university in the UK to offer a comprehensive range of modules in the language, literatures and cultures of Indonesia. Our students come from a range of educational backgrounds, and we also welcome mature students, many of whom may have worked or travelled in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore or Brunei. In addition to those studying for the full degree programme, each year we welcome European students on the Erasmus exchange programme who come to SOAS for one year of study.

As well as offering a range of language modules from beginners level to advanced, the department also offers modules on the literature and film of Indonesia which provide a penetrating view of life and thought in Indonesia. Students are further encouraged to learn to read texts in Malay from pre-modern Indonesia and Malaysia, written in Jawi script.  As well as specific modules on Indonesia, students will take some regional modules, in order to place Indonesia with the wider Southeast Asian context.

Students may choose to follow a three or four year degree. The four year option includes the invaluable experience of a year's study in Indonesia.

Indonesian at SOAS can be combined with a range of disciplines, for example: Indonesian and History, Indonesian and Politics, Indonesian and Anthropology or Indonesian and Music. Students taking the degree combined with Chinese or Korean begin study of Indonesian in their third year, on return from the year abroad in China or Korea.

Email: southeastasia@soas.ac.uk

Convenors

Key Information Set Data


Please see the Unistats data for the various combinations of this programme under the Combinations tab.

Combinations

May be combined with:

Combinations are available as either a 3 year degree or, depending on the combination, a 4 year degree with a (compulsory) year abroad.

+ 4 year degree with (compulsory) 1 year abroad
* Taught at University College London (UCL): apply to UCL only
** Taught at King's College, London

Key Information Set data

Click on a combined programme to load KIS data

Structure

Students will study 120 credits each year chosen from a range of available modules relating to various aspects of South East Asia, including Indonesian language modules. 

The first year features an introductory Indonesian language module for complete beginners in the language taught at a deliberately intensive pace. Students will also take the modules Introduction to South East Asia and South East Asia on Film, which together provide a foundation in the past and present of South East Asian culture. The other two modules are taken in the other subject of the degree. 

In Year 2 students will take Indonesian Language 2, an intermediate language module designed to develop the language skills acquired in the first year, incorporating the study of a range of contemporary prose texts and recorded audio material.

Students will also take two half modules in Indonesian Studies: Cultural Foundation of Indonesia, which explores the development of the idea of Indonesia as a nation, and Indonesian Literature ; Literature of the Revolution, which is an introduction to one of the most important and accessible periods of modern Indonesian literature.  Two further modules are taken in the other subject.

If students choose to do so, they may spend the third year studying Indonesian in Indonesia. 

In the final year, students will continue their language studies with the advanced language module Indonesian Language 3 (or with the fourth year module Indonesian Language 4 if they have spent their third year in Indonesia).  These modules are designed to develop language skills and at the same time enhance understanding of Indonesian culture and values through the study of a range of contemporary texts. Students may also take further modules in ‘Indonesia on Screen and Jawi and the Malay Manuscript Tradition’, or complete an undergraduate dissertation (Independent Study Project) or Extended Essay on a topic of their choice related to Indonesian. Students also take one or two modules in the second subject or an open option module.

Year 1 (3 or 4 Year Degree)
Core Module
Module Code Unit value Term Availability
Indonesian Language 1 155900448 1 UnitFull Year
Compulsory Modules

Students must take the following modules:

Module Code Unit value Term Availability
South East Asia on Film 155901318 0.5 UnitsTerm 2
Introduction to South East Asia 155901320 0.5 UnitsTerm 1
Other Subject

60 credits are taken in the second subject

Year 2 (3 or 4 Year Degree)
Core Module
Module Code Unit value Term Availability
Indonesian Language 2 155901022 1 UnitFull Year
Compulsory Module
Module Code Unit value Term Availability
Cultural Studies of Island South East Asia 155907002 0.5 UnitsTerm 2
Optional Module

Choose modules to the value of 15 credits from List A.

Other Subject

60 credits are taken in the second subject

Year 3 (3 Year Degree)
Compulsory Module
Module Code Unit value Term Availability
Indonesian Language 3 155901023 1 UnitFull Year
Optional Module

Choose modules to the value of 15 credits from List A.

Other Subject

60 credits are taken in the second subject

Year 3 (4 Year Degree)

Year abroad in Indonesia. Please see the Teaching & Learning tab for more details.

Year 4 (4 Year Degree)
Compulsory Module
Module Code Unit value Term Availability
Indonesian Language 4 155901024 1 UnitFull Year Not Running 2017/2018
Optional Module

Choose modules to the value of 15 credits from List A.

Other Subject

60 credits are taken in the second subject

List A
Module Code Unit value Term Availability
Jawi and the Manuscript Tradition 155901312 0.5 UnitsTerm 2 Not Running 2017/2018
Indonesia on Screen 155901354 0.5 UnitsTerm 1 Not Running 2017/2018
Cultural Studies of Mainland South East Asia 155907003 0.5 UnitsTerm 1
Vietnam on Screen 155907004 0.5 UnitsTerm 2
Thailand on Screen (post '97) 155901317 0.5 UnitsTerm 2
Queer Cinema in Asia 155907000 0.5 UnitsTerm 1
Orientalism on Screen 155901413 0.5 UnitsTerm 2
War, Revolution and Independence in South East Asian Literatures in Translation 155901316 0.5 UnitsTerm 1
The City and the Countryside in South East Asian Literatures 155901326 0.5 UnitsTerm 1 Not Running 2017/2018
English Literatures of South East Asia 155901410 0.5 UnitsTerm 1 Not Running 2017/2018
Under Western Eyes: European Writings on South East Asia 155907001 0.5 UnitsTerm 2 Not Running 2017/2018

Disclaimer

Teaching and Learning

Year abroad

SOAS is a member of ACICIS, the Australian Consortium for 'In-Country' Indonesian Studies, which organises the year abroad in Indonesia. Most students doing the Indonesian year abroad spend their first semester in Yogyakarta at Gadjah Mada University (UGM) in Central Java. During that semester students can choose a mix of Indonesian language classes and other regular curriculum immersion subjects at many of UGM's other faculties, according to the language ability and interest of the student. Most ACICIS students enrol in subjects within the Faculty of Cultural Sciences along with the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences. A smaller percentage of students elect to enrol in modules in Forestry, Law, Philosophy, Geography, or other faculties. All modules are examined by a combination of coursework and exams.

During the second semester students move to Bandung to study at Universitas Katolik Parahyangan (UNPAR). Students propose, refine, and undertake a semester-long field study project under the guidance of a nominated UNPAR supervisor. It is a unique opportunity to undertake original field study activities in one of Indonesia’s most dynamic cities and the country’s largest province (by population). Students present their final project to colleagues and members of the Faculty, and the 8-10,000 word report, written in Indonesian, is assessed by university staff.

Most students who choose to do the year in Indonesia will say that it is undoubtedly the highlight of their time at university. It is a unique opportunity to enter into Indonesian student life, and is very different from simply travelling in the region or visiting relatives. Most importantly, SOAS students returning from the year abroad reach an advanced level of Indonesian language competence which will ready them for work in the region or to conduct research in the language with complete confidence. Full details of the programmes as well as tips, feedback and examples of fieldwork projects may be found on the ACICIS website

Teaching & Learning

Language teaching is mostly in small tutorial groups; tapes and language laboratory facilities are available for formal teaching and self-study. Listening materials are available online and as MP4 downloads for self-study. Non-language modules are taught by lecture and seminar.

Students are assessed by a combination of written examination (and oral for language modules) and coursework, including essays, oral presentations, reaction papers and translations.

SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Pre Entry Reading

  • Hellwig, T. and Tagliacozzo, E. (eds). 2009. The Indonesia reader: history, culture, politics. Durham: Duke University Press.
  • Robson, S.O. 2004. Welcome to Indonesian, a beginner's survey of the language. Boston; Tuttle.
  • Taylor, J.G. 2003. Indonesia: peoples and histories. New Haven : Yale University Press.
  • Vickers, A. 2005. A history of modern Indonesia. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Fees and funding

Employment

As a graduate who specialised in Indonesian, you will have gained competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a study of language in combination with literature, development studies, economics, geography, history, history of art and archaeology, law, linguistics, music, politics, social anthropology or religion.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers, both in business and in the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Choosing to study a joint degree programme will increase the breadth of your knowledge, and will develop additional skills with which to further your studies of the region, or to make comparative study with other areas. The study of Indonesian may be combined with a huge range of other disciplines. For more information on the extra skills you will gain from your second subject, please see the relevant  departmental page.

As a graduate who specialised in Indonesia, you will have gained competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers, both in business and in the public sector. These include: written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem-solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Dept for Environment, Food and Rural affairs
Foreign & Commonwealth Office
JP Morgan
LCC Children's Services
The Jakata Post
London Underground - Graduate Scheme
Associated Press
The Red Cross
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Netherlands
Semporna Islands Project
Time Out, Paris
Lonely Planet

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Senior Heritage Consultant
Project Manager
Policy Advisor
Consul
Lecturer
Country Director
Company Director
Diplomat
Writer
Teacher
Learning and Development Officer
Consultant
International Marketing Executive
Support Worker

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website.

A Student's Perspective

My interest in Indonesian cultures and languages led me to SOAS which I think is the best institution for the study of Social Anthropology in the UK!

Lukas Fort

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    +44 (0)20 7898 4700
    By email:
    study@soas.ac.uk
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