SOAS University of London

Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS)

Miriam Weidl

  • Overview
  • Research

Overview

Weidl, Miriam - CCLPS PHD IMG - 240 186  56
Crossroads - Investigating the unexplored side of multilingualism

UK-based research student

Name:
Ms Miriam Weidl
Email address:
Thesis title:
"Loo wax!?" [What did you say!?] Multilingualism in Senegal - about the break(up) and the dynamicity of linguistic ‘systems’.
Internal Supervisors

Biography

Mia Weidl studied African Studies, Linguistics and Anthropology in Austria and gained a Mag.phil in 2012. Throughout her time at the University of Vienna she focused on West-African languages (Wolof, Fulfulde and Bambara) and cultures in different West-African States. She had the chance to go on several fieldtrips to Mali, Burkina Faso and Senegal. She also travelled to neighbouring countries, which gave her a broader overview of different linguistic realities. She became increasingly interested in Senegal, and its peoples, cultures, diversity and languages, so much so that she wrote her dissertation on language attitudes in Senegal.

After her studies in Vienna she joined the Crossroads Project at SOAS where she is working as a PhD student. The research for her PhD thesis focuses on multilingual individuals in two households in Senegal (in the urban area of Dakar and in Djibonker located in the rural area of Casamance). The research concentrates on the use of Wolof in the repertoires of multilingual speakers and aims to identify when a change of "language" happens, why it happens and if/how textual contexts are significant in these interactions. The prime question for closer examination is, how individual persons use their multilingual repertoire and registers in their daily life and how the individual character of the language repertoires and unique backgrounds, and how the interlocutor(s) in a conversation and the social/cultural environment, influence their range of language application. Mia is ‘very glad to have the opportunity to do my research in the supportive environment of the Crossroads team’.

PhD Research

The research for my PhD is part of the “Crossroads Project” and focusses on multilingual individuals in two areas of Senegal (the urban area of Dakar and a village in the rural area of Casamance). The research concentrates on the use of Wolof in the repertoire of multilingual speakers and aims to identify when a change of ‘language’ happens, why it happens and if textual contents are significant in these interactions. The prime question for a closer examination is, how individual persons use their multilingual repertoire and registers in their daily life and how the individual character of the language repertoires and unique backgrounds of the participants in a conversation and the social-cultural environment influence their range of language application.

Research

Senegal; Multilingualism; Wolof