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School of Law

Advanced Administrative Law

Course Code:
Unit value:
Year of study:
Year 3 of 3 or Year 4 of 4
Taught in:
Full Year

This advanced course in administrative law is aimed as a follow up to Public Law. In the first place the coverage is designed to provide partly from a comparative perspective an introduction to the functioning of governmental and administrative institutions but as an over arching theme this course seeks to provide a critical understanding of the mechanisms for the control of public power in the United Kingdom and a range of other jurisdictions. The first term will be concerned to survey the functioning of what might be termed the ‘administrative state’ with special attention devoted to the role of Parliament, freedom of information and the grievance chain comprising ombudsmen, tribunals and alternative dispute resolution (ADR). The second term will concentrate on evaluating the role of the courts in providing judicial remedies and in the protection of citizen rights. A task that will be approached with in depth study of judicial review and frequent comparative reference to other nations. It will appeal to students interested in public law, human rights and politics both from a domestic and international perspective.  

Objectives and learning outcomes of the course

  • Advanced knowledge of the academic debate surrounding the application of administrative law;
  • Engage with the various academic debates in administrative law;
  • Be able to analyse both legal and political controls on governmental bodies and their decisions;
  • Be able to critically analyse the various control mechanisms on public power;
  • Have a clear understanding and provide a critique of the principles of judicial review;
  • Be able to apply these legal principles to sophisticated legal problems.

Method of assessment

  • Unseen written exam: 100%

Suggested reading

  • P Leyland and G Anthony Textbook on Administrative Law, 7th edn, Oxford University Press, 2012.
  • C Harlow and R Rawlings Law and Administration, 3rd edn Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  • E Erocu and D Nelken (eds) Comparative Law: A Handbook, Oxford, Hart Publishing 2007 see in particular Chapter 13 J Bell ‘Administrative Law in a Comparative Perspective’ and Chapter 14 A Harding and P Leyland ‘Comparative Law in Constitutional Contexts’.