SOAS University of London

Facts and figures

years of Japanese studies: SOAS celebrates the impact.


  • With over 1000 undergraduate and postgraduate students at SOAS whose interdisciplinary studies include an aspect centred on Japan or Japanese no other institution in Europe has such a high concentration of students with a focus on the field.
  • There are two Meiji Jingu Japanese Studies Research Scholarships available. Each scholarship is valued at £7,000 in total.  
  • The Sasakawa Postgraduate Studentship is open to any full-time Postgraduate Taught Masters Degree Programmes at SOAS.
  • The SOAS library holds some 160,000 monographs for Japanese studies.
  • With one of the largest concentration of Japan specialists outside Japan the fields covered by academic members of staff include anthropology, art and archaeology, drama, economics, geography, history, language and literature, law, media, music, linguistics, politics, religion and sociology. 
  • We rank 2nd in the UK in the Times & Sunday Times University League Table 2015, 5th in the Complete University Guide 2015 (East & South East Asia) 
  • The number of specialists in Japan located in the various departments of the School makes the BA degree one of the largest Japanese studies programme in the world.


The JRC weekly seminar series examines the fundamental issues facing Japan today and provides unique opportunities to gain insight into Japan through the perspectives of internationally respected experts from both inside and outside of Japan.  

The JRC Annual Review reports the activities of the Centre and its member and lists past and forthcoming events in SOAS

Read Japanese Studies at SOAS, University of London by Professor Andrew Gerstle and Dr Alan Cummings

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Launch of Japanese Studies in the UK
Launch of Japanese Studies in the UK

The event will be chaired by Japan Society Chairman, Sir David Warren and will feature talks by the book’s editors, Sir Hugh Cortazzi and Professor Peter Kornicki, who will answer the question, why is it in our nation’s interest for British people to have a good understanding of modern Japan?