[skip to content]

Department of the Languages and Cultures of Japan and Korea

MA Korean Studies

Duration: One calendar year (full-time) Two or three years (part-time, daytime only)

Overview

Featured events

Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent)

Start of programme: September intake only

This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself.

The programme explores the history, politics, art, music and literature of Korea, as well as providing opportunities to study the languages of the region.

The MA in Korean Studies consists of four components. Students choose one major course and two minor courses from the lists on the Course Detail page.

Students who plan to go on to further research can take a higher-level Korean language course as a minor.

Students take three taught courses and must also complete a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Structure

Learn a language as part of this programme

Degree programmes at SOAS - including this one - can include language courses in more than forty African and Asian languages. It is SOAS students’ command of an African or Asian language which sets SOAS apart from other universities.

Students choose three taught units. One of these units must be a major and two units must be minors. Students can choose all three units from List A or two units from List A and one from List B. No more than one course can be chosen from List B.

List A
Majors or Minors
Majors together/Minors individually

These courses can be considered as majors only if both half-unit courses are taken together. Separately they will be considered as minors.

a)
b)
c)
Majors together with Directed Readings course/Minors individually

These courses can be considered as majors only if taken together with one of the Directed Reading courses in the Minors only list below. Separately they will be considered as minors.

Minors only
List B

Programme Specification

Teaching & Learning

Teaching & Learning

Students are exposed to a wide range of topics through participation in the seminars, general lectures and specialised workshops.

Lectures and Seminars

In most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation.

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

As a student specialising in Korean, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Korea.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website.

A Student's Perspective

I really enjoyed the intimate atmosphere of SOAS and the chance to learn just as much from my fellow students as from my lecturers. I also really enjoyed how open and helpful the lecturers were, and was grateful to learn that they honestly cared about my progress in their course. I always felt supported during my time at SOAS.

Katarina Starcevic, Georgetown University