SOAS University of London

Department of Economics

Political Economy of Development and Change in South Asia

Module Code:
153400143
Credits:
15
Year of study:
Final Year
Taught in:
Term 1

The aim of this course is to give a broad analytical and chronological outline of the macro political economic development of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh from Independence to the current period. The course contains a broad mix of macro economic theory, and empirical and historical analysis.

Prerequisites

pre-requisites:

153400123 OR 153400130 OR 153400124

(Macroeconomic Analysis OR Microeconomic Analysis OR Issues in Development Economics)

Objectives and learning outcomes of the module

LO1.    Outline the history of econoimc development in South Asia, in particular India, Pakistan and Bangladesh from the 1950s.

LO2.    Contrast the competing economies of the main South Asian countries.

LO3.    Explain clearly the issues of the macro political economy that these countries face today.

Workload

two hour lecture and a one hour seminar, each week.

Scope and syllabus

‘The State, Planning and Industrialisation’,

‘Radicalism and Reform’,

‘Democracy, Authoritarianism and Development’,

‘Liberalisation’.  

Method of assessment

one essay (3,000 words) worth 50% of the total mark for the module, due Term 1.

one essay (3,000 words) worth 50% of the total mark for the module, due Term 2.

Suggested reading

Core Reading:

Bardhan, P (1994) The Political Economy of Development in India, Oxford University Press.

Corbridge, S and J.Harriss (2000), Reinventing India: Liberalisation, Hindu Nationalism and Popular Democracy, Polity Press

T. J. Byres, T.J (1999), The Indian Economy: Major Debates since Independence, Oxford University Press.

Kohli, A (1990), ‘Democracy and Discontent: India’s growing Crisis of Governability’, Cambridge University Press.

Harriss-White, B (2003), ‘India Working’ Cambridge University Press.

Panagariya, A (2008), ‘India: The Emerging Giant’, Oxford University Press

Lieven, A (2011), ‘Pakistan: A Hard Country’, Allen Lane.

Zaidi, S.A (2005), ‘Issues in Pakistan’s Economy’ Oxford University Press.

Additional Reading:

Acemoglu, D., S.Johnson and J.A.Robinson, (2001), ‘The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation’, American Economic Review, 91, p1369-1401.

Khan, M.H. (2009) Governance Capabilities and the Property Rights Transition in Developing Countries.

Khan, M.H. (2012) ‘Governance and Growth: History, Ideology and Methods of Proof.’ in Akbar N., Botchwey, K. Stein, H. and Stiglitz, J. (eds). Good Growth and Governance in Africa: Rethinking Development Strategies. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 51-79.

Kohli, A (1994), ‘Where Do High Growth Political Economies Come From? The Japanese Lineage of Korea’s Developmental State’, World Development, 22:9, p1269-1293.

Leftwich, A (2000), ‘States of Development: On the Primacy of Politics in Development’, Polity Press, Chapter 7.

Woo-Cumings (1999), ‘The Developmental State’, Cambridge University Press, Chapters by Chang and Herring.

Chibber, V (2003), ‘Locked In Place: State-Building and Late Industrialisation in India’, Princeton University Press, Chapters 1, 2, 4 and 6.

Kohli, A (1994), ‘Where Do High Growth Political Economies Come From? The Japanese Lineage of Korea’s Developmental State’, World Development, 22:9, p1269-1293.

Alavi, Hamza (1983) ‘Class and State’, in Gardezi, Hassan and Jamil Rashid (eds) Pakistan: The Roots of Dictatorship, London: Zed Press.

Gardezi, Hassan & Jamil Rashid. (1983) Pakistan: The Roots of Dictatorship, see articles by Gardezi and Rashid: Pakistan Independent: Theory and Practice of Political Economy, Alavi, H.: Class and State in Pakistan, Amjad, R. Industrial Concentration and Economic Power.

Khan, M (2000), ‘The Political Economy of Industrial Policy in Pakistan, 1947 – 1971’, SOAS, Department of Economics, Working Paper 98…available at: http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/9867/.

Kothari, R (1964), ‘The Congress ‘System’ in India’, Asian Survey, 4:12 reprinted in Hasan, Z (Eds) (2002), ‘Parties and Party Politics in India’ , Oxford University Press.

McCartney, M (2009), ‘India – The Political Economy of Growth, Stagnation and the State, 1951-2007’, Routledge, Chapters 4-8 (relevant sections on institutions).

Nayyar, Deepak (1994) Industrial Growth and Stagnation: The Debate in India. Bombay: Oxford University Press, 1994. Especially see chapters by Chandrasekhar, Nayyar and Ranagarajan.

Alavi, Hamza (1983) ‘Class and State’, in Gardezi, Hassan and Jamil Rashid (eds) Pakistan: The Roots of Dictatorship, London: Zed Press.

Jalal, A (1995), ‘Democracy and Authoritarianism in South Asia: A Comparative and Historical Perspective’, Cambridge University Press, p48-54 (Muslim League/Pakistan).

Jones, P.E (2003), ‘The Pakistan People’s Party: Rise to Power’, Oxford University Press, Chapter 4.

Huber, E D,Rueschemeyer and J.D.Stephens (1993), ‘The Impact of Economic Development on Democracy’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 7:3, Summer, p71-85.

Amjad, R (1986), ‘Impact of Workers’ Remittances from the Middle East on Pakistan’s Economy: Some Selected Issues’, The Pakistan Development Review, 25:4, p757-785.

Burki, S.J (1988), ‘Pakistan Under Zia, 1977-1988’, Asian Survey, 28:10.

McCartney, M (2009), ‘India – The Political Economy of Growth, Stagnation and the State, 1951-2007’, Routledge, Chapter 6. Also, Chapters 4-8 (relevant sections on institutions)

Rudolph, L.I and S.H.Rudolph (1987), ‘‘In Pursuit of Lakshmi: The Political Economy of the Indian State’, Cambridge University Press, Chapters 4,7,8.

Hasnain, Z (2008), ‘The Politics of Service Delivery in Pakistan: Political Parties and the Incentives for Patronage, 1988-1999’, The Pakistan Development Review, 47:2, p129-151.

Khan, Mushtaq (2014) 'Aid and Governance in Vulnerable States: Bangladesh and Pakistan since 1971.' The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 656 (1). pp. 59-78.

Zaidi, S.A. (1999), ‘Is Poverty Now a Permanent Phenomenon in Pakistan?’, EPW, October 9th, p2943-2951.

Corbridge, S and J.Harriss (2000), ‘Reinventing India: Liberalisation, Hindu Nationalism and Popular Democracy’, Polity Press, Chapter 5.

Kohli, A (1990), ‘Democracy and Discontent: India’s growing Crisis of Governability’, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 11.

Kohli, A (2006), ‘Politics of Economic Growth in India, 1980-2005, Part I: The 1980s’, Economic and Political Weekly, April 1st, p1251-1259.

Panagariya, A (2004), ‘India in the 1980s and 1990s: A Triumph of Reforms’, IMF Working Paper, March, WP/04/43).

Rodrik, D and A.Subramanian (2004), ‘From ‘Hindu Growth’ to Productivity Surge: The Mystery of the Indian Growth Transition’, available online.

Ahluwalia, Montek S. (2018) “India’s Economic Reforms: Achievements and Next Steps.” Asian Economic Policy Review, published online 14 November 2018.

Khan, Mushtaq (2011) India’s evolving Political Settlement and the Challenges of Sustaining Development, available online.

Kohli, A (2006), ‘Politics of Economic Growth in India, 1980-2005: Part II: The 1990s and Beyond’, Economic and Political Weekly, April 8th, p1361-1370.

Panagariya, A (2004), ‘India in the 1980s and 1990s: A Triumph of Reforms’, IMF Working Paper, March, WP/04/43), available at: https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/2004/wp0443.pdf

also, published in Economic and Political Weekly June 19 2004.

Pedersen, J.D (2000), ‘Explaining Economic Liberalisation in India: State and Society Perspectives’, World Development, 28:2.

Rodrik and Subramanian (2004) ‘From ‘Hindu Growth’ to Productivity Surge: The Mystery of the Indian Growth Transition’, IMF Working Paper, WP/04/77: http://web.hks.harvard.edu/publications/workingpapers/citation.aspx?PubId=2066

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