SOAS University of London

Department of Politics and International Studies

Mr Jack Joy

BA (York), MSc MRes (SOAS, University of London)
  • Overview
  • Teaching
  • Research

Overview

Jack Joy
Name:
Mr Jack Joy
Email address:
Address:
SOAS University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG
Building:
Russell Square: College Buildings
Office No:
221
Academic Support Hours:
Tuesdays 5pm - 6pm
Thesis title:
The Spectacle of Resistance: Repertoires of Power in the Discourse of Hizbullah [working title]
Year of Study:
4
Internal Supervisors

Publications

  • "Eulogies for the Resistance: Hizbullah, Syria, and the Crisis Imaginary" in Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, vol. 10, no.2-3 (2017).
  • “Islamic Redistributive Justice in the Middle East” in St. Antony’s International Review, vol.10, no.4 (2014).

Affiliations

Teaching

Economy, Politics and Society in Middle East & North Africa

Research

Jack's research explores the strategies of control that underlie Hizbullah’s performative politics, arguing that the assemblage of practices and discourses through which it seeks to bring in to being an idealised ‘culture of Resistance’ helps to account for the durability of its power. It contends that in spite of its internal contradictions, particularly those that have become even more acute as a result of its involvement in the Syrian civil war, the successful mobilisation of spectacular narratives and dramaturgies has long enabled the ‘Party of God’ to flatten out its incoherence, suppress the emergence of alternative webs of solidarity, and to activate its Lebanese-Shi’a base within its dispositif. In one regard these are foundational to the organisation’s efforts to structure the social imaginary of its constituents and to situate them within a particular perceptual regime that renders intelligible complex social realities. Yet such forms of political theatre also shed light on disciplinary technologies that are intrinsic to Resistance as an identity and a ‘methodology’, as Hizbullah seeks to cultivate subjects who through their everyday comportment further naturalise its domination.