SOAS University of London

Department of Linguistics, School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

BA Linguistics and... (2022 entry)

Select year of entry: 2022 2021

  • Combinations
  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Fees and funding
  • Employment
  • Apply

Overview

Overview and entry requirements

The BA Linguistics combined degree at SOAS gives students the tools to understand how the world’s languages differ and how they are similar, how they relate historically and interact today, and above all how they are structured. Linguistics takes you beyond merely speaking a language, and helps you see how languages, in all their diversity, actually function.

Modern linguistics is the scientific study of all aspects of the world’s languages from their sound systems and grammatical structure through to the interaction of language with culture, the study of meaning in language, and the use of language in modern technology. 

Linguistics at SOAS is all about appreciating the diversity of cultures beyond Europe and the English-speaking world. Anyone who has a particular interest in the languages of a country or region in Asia, Africa or the Middle East will feel very much at home on this programme. More generally, Linguistics is the ideal subject for those who are interested in human culture and psychology, but who enjoy approaching questions about our world within in a systematic, precise, logical intellectual framework.

See Linguistics Department

Combine Linguistics with other subjects

  • Other disciplines: Development Studies, East Asian Studies, Languages and Cultures, Politics, Social Anthropology
  • Languages: Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean

Why study Linguistics at SOAS

  • UK Top 10 in the 2021 QS World University Rankings
  • SOAS is unique in the UK for offering a range of subject combinations that include the opportunity to study the languages, literature, and cultures of Africa, Asia and the Near and Middle East
  • unparalleled range of options in choosing their second subject of study
  • unrivalled staff expertise in the UK and worldwide in a wide range of Asian, African, Middle Eastern and Australian languages
  • access to SOAS’s library, one of the UK’s five dedicated national research libraries
  • dedicated Linguistics Resource Room, with computers, sound-proofed recording booth, video and audio editing facilities

Key Information Set (KIS) data

The information for BA, BSc, or LLB programmes refer to data taken from the single subject degrees offered at SOAS; however, due to the unique nature of our programmes many subjects have a separate set of data when they are studied alongside another discipline. In order to get a full picture of their chosen subject(s) applicants are advised to look at both sets of information where these occur.

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings

Start of programme: September

Mode of Attendance: Full-time

Entry requirements

Featured events

duration:
3 or 4 years depending on precise combination

Fees 2022/23

Fees for 2022/23 entrants per academic year

UK fees:
£9,250
Overseas fees:
£20,350


Please note that fees go up each year. Further details see 'Fees and funding' (tab on this page) or the Registry's undergraduate tuition fees page.

Convenors


Please see the Unistats data for the various combinations of this programme under the Combinations tab.

Combinations

May be combined with:

+ 4-year degree with (compulsory) one year spent abroad
++ 3 or 4-year degree with option of one year abroad

Key Information Set data

Click on a combined programme to load KIS data

Structure

Structure

Learn a language as part of this programme

Degree programmes at SOAS - including this one - can include language courses in more than forty African and Asian languages. It is SOAS students’ command of an African or Asian language which sets SOAS apart from other universities.

Students take 120 credits per year composed of Core, Compulsory and Optional modules.

Core modules: A core module is required for the degree programme, so must always be taken and passed before you move on to the next year of your programme.

Compulsory modules: A compulsory module is required for the degree programme, so must always be taken, and if necessary can be passed by re-taking it alongside the next year of your programme.

Optional modules: These are designed to help students design their own intellectual journey while maintaining a strong grasp of the fundamentals.

Students taking the BA Linguistics and ... together with a language (when combined with BA Languages and Cultures, BA Arabic, or BA East Asian Studies) may spend the second or third year of their degree as year abroad.

Programme

Year 1

Core Module

Core modules must be passed in order to proceed to the following year of study.

Students will take the following core module:

Module Code Credits Term
Introduction to Linguistics 152900116 15 Term 1
Compulsory Modules
Module Code Credits Term
Languages of the World 152900118 15 Term 2
Sounds, grammar and meaning in language 152900119 15 Term 2
Language, Learning and Writing 152900117 15 Term 1
Guided Options

Choose 15 credits from List A or Open Options

Other Subject

Students take 60 credits from their other subject.

Year 2 - Linguistics Pathway

Core Module

Students will take the following core module:

Module Code Credits Term
Approaches to Syntax 152900032 15 Term 1
Compulsory Modules
Module Code Credits Term
Introduction to Research 152900121 15 Term 2
Meaning and Interpretation 152900100 15 Term 1
Guided Options

Choose 15 credits from List A or Open Options 

Other Subject

Students take 60 credits from their other subject.

Year 2 - Translation Pathway

Core Module

Students will take the following core modules:

Module Code Credits Term
Introduction to Translation Theory 152900113 15 Term 1
Compulsory Modules
Module Code Credits Term
Introduction to Research 152900121 15 Term 2
Translating Cultures 1 155906737 15 Term 2
Understanding Texts 152900123 15 Term 1

Year 3 (or Year 4 for combined degrees with a year abroad) - Linguistics Pathway

Core Module

Students will take the following module:

Module Code Credits Term
Independent Study Project in Linguistics 152900009 30 Full Year
Compulsory Modules
Module Code Credits Term
Advanced Topics in Linguistics 152900115
Guided Options

Choose 15 credits from List A or Open Options

Other Subject

Students take 60 credits from their other subject.

Year 3 (or Year 4 for combined degrees with a year abroad) - Translation Pathway

Core Module

Students will take a 30 credit Translation Project as the core module

Compulsory Modules
Module Code Credits Term
Translation Technology 155906738 15 Term 1
Guided Options

Choose 15 credits from List B or Open Options

Other Subject

Students take 60 credits from their other subject.

List A, Guided Options - Linguistics Pathway

Year 2, 3 and 4

Module Code Credits Term
Linguistic Typology 152900044 15 Term 2
Historical Linguistics 152900037 15 Term 2
Language, Society and Communication 152900083 15 Term 1
Philosophies of Language 158000196 15 Term 1
Introduction to Translation Theory 152900113 15 Term 1
Translation Technology 155906738 15 Term 1
List B, Guided Options - Translation Pathway

Year 2, 3 and 4

Module Code Credits Term
Introduction to Research 152900121 15 Term 2
Approaches to Syntax 152900032 15 Term 1
Philosophies of Language 158000196 15 Term 1

Programme Specification

Important notice

The information on the programme page reflects the intended programme structure against the given academic session. If you are a current student you can find structure information on the previous year link at the top of the page or through your Department. Please read the important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules.

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning

The linguistics component of the combined subject degree is designed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the way that languages are universally structured and trains students to master all the basic skills necessary for the analysis of different sound systems and semantics (the study of meaning in language). In addition, students may also take modules dealing with language and social communication (focusing on the interaction of language and social groups), morphology (the structure of words), historical linguistics (the historical development of languages), phonetics and the structure of an African or Asian language.

Contact hours

Each module generally involves a 2-hour lecture and a tutorial, a 1-hour small-group discussion class each week. The tutorial is intended for further discussion of points made in the lecture and for the development of linguistic problem-solving skills.

Assessment varies according to the nature of the modules. Introductory modules are assessed in the end of year exams in May/June. Other modules may involve written examinations, practical tests, course work, essays or a combination of these. 

Year abroad

If linguistics is studied with a language, the second or third year of the degree is usually spent abroad.

SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Reading 

"Linguistics is such a varied and wide-ranging subject, it’s hard to recommend just one book! So here are two, written by two of the most famous linguists working today, with two very different approaches to how we should understand language. Read them both and see which approach you prefer!"
- Dr Christopher Lucas, Senior Lecturer in Arabic Linguistics

  • Don’t Sleep, There Are Snakes by Daniel Everett tells the fascinating story of the author’s many years of fieldwork studying the language of the Pirahã people of Amazonia. We also learn how, through his work with the Pirahã, Everett became convinced that the fundamental ideas of the world’s most influential linguist, Noam Chomsky, were flawed.
  • The Language Instinct by Steven Pinker, by contrast, is an accessible and entertaining introduction to those big ideas of Chomsky’s, as well as a surprisingly comprehensive overview of many of the most important and interesting topics that linguists collectively investigate.

Fees and funding

Employment

Employment

Graduates of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with skills in written and oral communication, analysis and problem solving.

Recent School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics graduates have been hired by:

  • Africa Matters
  • Amnesty International
  • Arab British Chamber of Commerce
  • BBC World Service
  • British High Commission
  • Council for British Research in the Levant
  • Department for International Development
  • Edelman
  • Embassy of Jordan
  • Ernst & Young
  • Foreign & Commonwealth Office
  • Google
  • Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies
  • Middle East Eye
  • Saïd Foundation
  • TalkAbout Speech Therapy
  • The Black Curriculum
  • The Telegraph
  • United Nations Development Programme
  • UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency
  • Wall Street Journal

Find out about our Careers Service.

A Student's Perspective

I think the variety at SOAS is one of its strongest aspects – simply being a student at SOAS has taught me a lot about cultures and has given me the opportunity to meet so many great people.

Lialin Rotem-Stibbe

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