SOAS University of London

Department of Development Studies

MSc Migration Mobility and Development

duration:
One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time, daytime only). We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study.

Fees 2017/18

UK/EU fees:
£10,995
Overseas fees:
£18,790

Fees for 2017/18 entrants. This is a Band 3 fee. The fees are per academic year. Please note that fees go up each year. Further details can be found in the Fees and Funding tab on this page or in the Registry Postgraduate Tuition Fees page

2017 Entry requirements

  • Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent). Relevant work experience may also be considered.

Featured events

  • Overview
  • Structure
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Fees and funding
  • Employment
  • Apply

Overview

Start of programme: September intake only

Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time

Who is this programme for?: The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:
  • Sedentarism and the study of migration
  • Polities & economies of migration
  • Colonialism
  • Nations, states and territory
  • Globalisation
  • (Illegal) workers in the global economy
  • Place and emplacement
  • Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
  • Transnational migrants & mobile lives
  • Trafficking
  • Development and migration
  • Diasporas and development
  • Refugees and internally displaced persons
  • Development-induced displacement
  • Environment and refugees/displacement
  • Climate change-related migration
  • Policy responses to migration
  • Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Convenors

Structure

Overview

Students must take 180 credits comprised of 120 taught credits (including core and option modules) and a 60 credit dissertation.

All students take core modules, ‘Migration & Development’ and a ‘Dissertation in Development Studies’. They then choose EITHER ‘Political Economy of Development’ OR ‘Theory, Policy and Practice of Development’. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

Specialisation

Students also take option modules, allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly using them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying optional modules to their individual dissertation topic, students tailor their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Please note that not all option modules may run every year.  Modules at other institutions (intercollegiate) are not part of the approved programme structure.

Part-time Study

Students can take this programme part-time over 2 or 3 years. Students usually complete their core modules in Year 1 and their option modules and dissertation in subsequent years.

Core Modules

Students take the following TWO core modules:

Module Code Credits Term Availability
Migration and development 15PDSC006 30 Full Year
Dissertation in Development Studies 15PDSC999 60 Full Year
Optional Core Modules

Students then choose ONE of the following modules:

Module Code Credits Term Availability
Political economy of development 15PDSC002 30 Full Year
Theory, policy and practice of development 15PDSC001 30 Full Year
Option Modules

Students choose modules to the value of 30 credits from List 1 and 30 credits from List 2 below:

(1) Option Modules in the Department Of Development Studies
Module Code Credits Term Availability
Agrarian Development, Food Policy and Rural Poverty 15PDSH026 15 Term 1
Aid and Development 15PDSH027 15 Term 1
Battlefields of Method: Approaches to International Development Research 15PDSC008 30 Full Year
Civil society, social movements and the development process 15PDSH001 15 Term 1
Development Practice 15PDSH013 15 Term 2
Environment, Governance and Development 15PDSH050 15 Term 1 Not Running 2017/2018
Extractive Industries, Energy, Biofuels and Development in a Time of Climate Change 15PDSH048 15 Term 2
Famine and food security 15PDSH022 15 Term 2 Not Running 2017/2018
Fundamentals of research methods for Development Studies 15PDSH017 15 Term 1
Gender and Development 15PDSH010 15 Term 1
Global Commodity Chains, Production Networks and Informal Work 15PDSH024 15 Term 2 Not Running 2017/2018
Global Health and Development 15PDSH051 15 Term 2 Not Running 2017/2018
Issues in Forced Migration 15PDSH015 15 Term 2
Marxist Political Economy and Global Development 15PDSH053 15 Term 2
Migration and Policy 15PDSH029 15 Term 1 Not Running 2017/2018
Natural resources, development and change: putting critical analysis into practice 15PDSH031 15 Term 2
Neoliberalism, Democracy and Global Development 15PDSH054 15 Term 1
Problems of Development in the Middle East and North Africa 15PDSH019 15 Term 2
Security 15PDSH020 15 Term 1
The working poor and development 15PDSH030 15 Term 2
Understanding Economic Migration: Theories, Patterns and Policies 15PDSH032 15 Term 2 Not Running 2017/2018
Water and Development:Conflict and Governance 15PDSH049 15 Term 2
(2) Open Options in other Departments

Please copy the following link into your browser: https://www.soas.ac.uk/students/modulesignup/pg-open-options/

Non-Assessed Course

All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term, non-assessed course, Economics for Beginners, which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics.

 

This is the structure for 2017/18 applicants

If you are a current student you can find structure information on Moodle or through your Faculty.

Programme Specification

Disclaimer

Teaching and Learning

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally either a 1 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial, or a 2 hour seminar.  Some modules are assessed by 100% coursework and others by both coursework and examination.


In addition, a third of the degree is given over to writing a supervised 10,000 word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Pre Entry Reading

Bakewell, O., 2010. 'Some Reflections on Structure and Agency in Migration Theory', Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 1-20 Available through Informaworld

Bartram D., Poros M., and Monforte P, 2014. Key concepts in Migration London: Sage

Castles S. & Miller M., 2009. The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World, 4th edition. New York: Guilford Press. Available in SOAS Library.

Chant, S. (ed.), 1992. Gender and migration in developing countries. London: Belhaven Press. Available in SOAS Library.

Cohen R., 2006. Migration and its enemies. Global Capital, Migrant Labour and the Nation-State Aldershot: Ashgate

Cortina J, Ochoa-Reza E., 2014. New Perspectives on International Migration and Development. Columbia University Press: New York

Faist T., Fauser M. & Kivisto K, 2011. The migration-development nexus: A transnational perspective. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Fiddian-Qasmiyeh E., Long K., Sigona N. (eds), 2014. The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies OUP: Oxford

Gardner, K. and Osella, F. 2003, ‘Migration, modernity and social transformation in South Asia’, Contributions to Indian Sociology, Vol. 37, No. 1-2, pp. v-xxviii Available through SAGE Premier

Glick Schiller N. & Faist T., 2010. Migration, development, and transnationalization: A critical stance. New York: Berghahn Books

Harvey D., 1982. The Limits to Capital. Oxford: Blackwell

Harzig C. and Hoerder D., 2009. What Is Migration History? Cambridge: Polity Press.

IOM World Migration Reports

Fees and funding

Tuition Fees

Full details of postgraduate tuition fees can be found on the Registry's Postgraduate Tuition Fees page.

This is a Band 3 tuition fee.

Fees for 2017/18 entrants. The fees below are per academic year. Please note that fees go up each year. 

Full-timePart-time 2 YearsPart-time 3 Years
UK/EU
Students
Overseas
Students
UK/EU
Students
Overseas
Students
UK/EU
Students
Overseas
Students
£10,995 £18,790 £5,498 £9,395 £3,665 £6,263
Scholarships
Felix Non- Indian Scholarship

Application Deadline: 2017-01-31 17:00

Felix Scholarships

Application Deadline: 2017-01-31 17:00

John Loiello AFSOAS FISH Scholarship

Application Deadline: 2017-02-22 17:00

Sasakawa Postgraduate Studentship

Application Deadline: 2017-02-22 17:00

The Prospect Burma Scholarship

Application Deadline: 2017-02-22 17:00

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.  

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website.

A Student's Perspective

The Department of Development Studies has a high calibre of lecturers and tutors with a wide range of backgrounds. My teachers have been really inspiring, and are always open to questions and feedback.

Jessica Blomfield

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  • Contact us
    By phone:
    +44 (0)20 7898 4700
    By email:
    study@soas.ac.uk
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